Teaching the Secret of the Martial Arts Universe

Newsletter 944

The Higher Martial Art

I had an interesting class the other day,
one of the students is always late,
always lazy,
and wastes his and other student’s time.
So I sat him down,
along with the whole class,
and I chewed him up a little bit.
I said,

five years from now
you’re going to have a job,
a wife,
a kid on the way,
are you going to give people a hard time then?

Blank look back at me.

Then:
Martial Arts are about control.
Fighting is part of it,
but you have to get past fighting
and learn how to control.
Life is nothing but people
and how you control them,
or how you are controlled by them.

He cocks his head quizzically.

I’m the boss here,
can you control me?

He shakes his head no.

So you won’t be able to control your boss
when you get a job.
You won’t be able to move ahead,
you won’t be able to choose what to do,
you won’t be able to work your own hours,
you won’t be able to make the money you want to make.

Now he’s blinking.
I’m starting to make sense to him.

Martial arts is about control.
If you don’t learn control here,
you may not have a chance later.
The boss in five years
doesn’t care about you learning control,
he just wants to get the job done,
and he is going to go with the people
who can best control what they do.

My voice is raised now,
and the class is staring.
There are times when I want them to think,
now is not one of those times.
Now I want them to get it.
Shut up and get it:
the world belongs to those who can control it.

I finished with:
If you’re an idiot now,
if you’re going to waste your time
by being lazy and foolish,
then you’re going to be an idiot in five years.
So I suggest you practice these forms
so you can learn to control your body.
And practice those applications,
so you can learn to control your opponent.
And practice freestyle drills and methods,
so you can control the chaos that life can be.

Now,
the student in question improved slightly.
So I will have to repeat it tomorrow,
maybe in altered form,
maybe in connection with some other dojo lesson.
And I will repeat it again and again.
Because that’s what teaching really is.

Here’s a link on how to translate chaos to control,
force to flow,
the world to your pleasure.

http://monstermartialarts.com/how-to-translate-karate-into-tai-chi-chuan/

Have a great work out!
Al

http://monstermartialarts.com/how-to-translate-karate-into-tai-chi-chuan/

Following is a great win that shows one thing…you aren’t going to get the answers, you are going to get the questions, the questions that lead you to understanding your own martial art. Do you have the kind of mind that can do this?

A WIN!

Al, the reason I finely decided to order these DVD’s (Five Army Tai Chi Chuan) was that after one of my classes, which I am continuing to teach at the park, I was invited by a fellow name John to learn Tai Chi with him and some of his students. I found the art to be fun, but when the class ended I inquired about the martial application and to my surprise John told me that there where none, that it was only to be used for relaxation.
Bull, I then showed him how I could turn just the few moves that I had just learned into a usable defense (only because I read the Master Instructor manual.) This got me thinking about this art and I know the best place for me to learn it was from you.
Have a great week
Stephen

Why Karate Masters are Wrong

And what to do about it…

Defeating the Linearity of Karate

I was watching videos
of people doing karate on the internet.
This included demo teams,
old masters,
and whoever,
and I was struck
by wrong they are doing karate,
by how they didn’t really know karate.

The funny thing is
karate is one of the most powerful arts I know,
yet everybody is doing it wrong.
Let me give you one example.

Watch a video on youtube,
watch a demo team for karate.
They are fast, powerful, explosive.
It is not good karate.
Why?
Because their arms and legs move back and forth
in a linear manner,
stopping and starting.
Real karate is liquid,
it does not stop and start.
At the end of every movement there is a circle,
often too small to be easily seen.
this circle avoids the stopping and starting of the muscles.
It takes effort and muscular exertion
to stop and start muscle motion.
When you have a small circle
somewhere in the end of the motion,
which leads into the beginning of the next motion,
you are doing real karate.

Now,
those who don’t understand will argue,
that is okay,
they will remember
and eventually come around.
For those of you who are frowning,
standing up and checking to see
if you have a little loop on the end of a punch or block
(both ends)
the truth is dawning.
Karate is not linear.
It is not a rigid piston effect,
it is a looping,
neverending effect.
And,
what do you get out of it?

The loop helps change one move into the next
the loop saves energy and is more efficient
it is faster
your body becomes more liquid,
more fluid,
you start to develop ‘pulsing power.’
Pulsing power is when you…
push with the legs
turn the hips
throw the punch.
Not exactly together,
but one…two…three,
so fast that the punch becomes one motion,
each action lending power and energy to the next action,
and yet becoming more and more fluid.

Now,
I read of this concept originally
while reading books on Chinese martial arts.
And,
I observed my instructor,
who was quick and whippy,
fluid like a striking snake.
And I read about a more fluid karate in Shotokai
(not shotokan)
which is supposed to be the style
funakoshi handed down his lineage to.

And I thought about it,
and developed it,
and came to realize the truth of it.
So take your time,
practice your forms,
and search for places where you can
add a loop at the end of a technique.
Maybe it is in the motion of the hand,
maybe it’s a turn of the hip,
a sink of the hip,
and flip of the shoulder.
Whatever it is,
you’re now on the path to true karate.

And,
all these guys doing wrong karate?
They are phenomenal,
not to be disrespected,
but it is a simple matter of physics
that reveal them to be expert beginners,
even master beginners,
who haven’t made the transition past beginner,
into the real thing.

When I teach karate to newbies
I usually let them work on the piston effect.
But when they are starting to remember everything,
I shift them to the looping effect.

Now,
I don’t talk about the whiplike effect much,
I instead recommend people do Matrix Karate,
but if you have matrix karate under your belt,
you could look at Temple Karate.
I do more advanced forms there,
and you can probably,
if you have a quick eye,
see how I add the teensiest of loops
to make my karate fluid.

But your eye has to be quick,
because the longer you train,
the smaller your loops become
until no one can see your loops.

Have a great work out!
Al

Matrix Karate
http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/matrix-karate/

Temple Karate
http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/temple-karate/

Following is a great win that shows one thing…you aren’t going to get the answers, you are going to get the questions, the questions that lead you to understanding your own martial art. Do you have the kind of mind that can do this?

A WIN!

I picked up Matrix Karate from you; and I definitely get it.  My area of study is Kajukenbo; and based on watching the Matrix Karate DVD last night, I am reasonably sure that matrixing Kajukenbo would be very straight forward.  Time consuming, yes, difficult no.  I think it would be best to break Kajukenbo into its 7 arts (Karate, Judo, Jiujitsu, Kenpo, Boxing, Kung Fu, and Escrima), and matrix each of those.  My questions are: do you think that is the right approach? Is there a particular order you think these should be taught in? Do you teach each matrix’d art to completion, then move to the next? And, how does sport karate fit in?  And finally; for the traditional forms, would those be one entire section? Or would you recommend splitting them into each sub-section of the art?

Making a Punch Out of Nothing…

Newsletter 942

The Punch That is NOT a Punch!

I’ve probably thrown a few million punches in my life.
50 years times 365 days
(and yes, I do work out EVERY day!)
multiplied by as little as 100 punches
(and that is a little)
equals 1,825,000 punches
Truth,
I usually throw hundreds, if not thousands,
of punches a day.
In that time I’ve learned some nifty things.
How to punch with ‘chi power.’
How to put out a candle from a couple of feet away.
How to break a bone
A complete method for being able to multiply
the power of your punch
by many, many times.
It’s all written in ‘The Punch,’
if you’re interested.
But I’m going to talk about the punch that isn’t a punch here,
the punch that steps outside all the theories and writing I’ve done.

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/hard-punch/

When you punch it is a process of:
sinking weight in a stance,
breathing out at the same time,
and aligning your bones.
Aligning your bones efficiently would be called CBM
Coordinated Body Motion.

Now,
keep that all in mind when I say
you should do all this
and let the other person run into your punch.
That’s right,
you don’t punch him,
you assume the position of a punch,
with good stance and body alignment,
a nanosecond before impact,
and it is almost like the fellow runs into your punch.
But the key is this:
You have to construct your body so that it is ungiving.
You have to sink it into the ground,
and arrange the bones so that the structure does not give way
under impact.
This is all a matter of timing.
Sure,
you can hit somebody,
see if you can power up them biceps
(it’s actually the triceps that is the punching muscle,
in conjunction with a lot of other muscles besides)
slam your body around,
see if you can collapse his structure
by overloading it with your mass and mayhemish thoughts,
but my way is easier.
If you can master the nanosecond timing,
of settling your body into stance and strike
just as he reaches you,
he runs into the punch.

To tell you the truth,
I usually don’t tighten my fist anymore,
I usually just stick the aligned bones of my fists
into the space my opponent is about to occupy.

And,
to tell the truth,
it works better with blocks,
but you can make it work with punches,
if you are willing to
first, read ‘The Punch’
second, do 4 or 5 million punches
(which is probably more what I have done
than this measly million or two)
three, believe it is possible.
Without belief nothing is possible.

You just have to believe.

Have a great work out!
Al

Tai Chi is great for developing intuition and abilities,
here’s the link, and below it a great win!

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/hard-punch/

A WIN!

…the things you teach (keys to unlocking the arts) and then you encourage people to think for them self, for eg. In your book the punch you speak of two ways to punch, letting the force run back up the arm or making it pop in the opponent’s body.
I have seen a demo of a guy breaking blocks, a whole stack and he breaks the 5th one down. Then a light bulb went on
“Did sifu just teach me dim mak!”
If I can control where my punch pops, under some of those acu points are vital organs, nerve and vascular plexuses. Is this the secret to the death touch, hmm?
This is some REALLY DEEEP SHIT!!!
There more but this eg made me stop and think. Again my hat off to you sir

Louis R

Little Girl Uses Dreams to Catch Two Crooks

Newsletter 941
Catching the Crooks

When my grandmother was a little girl
the family was very religious,
went to church every Sunday.

One Sunday her younger sister was sick.
The family decided that just this once
she could stay home.
Sniffling and snuffling,
the young girl went to her room
at the end of the second floor hall
and went to sleep.

Shortly after the rest of the family went to church,
a car pulled up in front of the house.
Two rough looking fellows got out,
looked around,
and hurried up the walk.

In the house they quickly checked for occupants.
One fo the crooks ascended the stairs
and walked down the hallway,
looking in every room.
He stopped right before he reached the young girl’s room.
Heck, there wasn’t anybody home.
He turned around and helped his friend ransack the hosue.

They took jewelry,
silverware,
anything that wasn’t nailed down.
They put the swag in several pillow cases
they had taken out of a closet.
They walked down the front walk
got in their car and drove away.

An hour later the family returned home.
Shocked,
they went through the house,
the mother broke down in tears
and the father called the cops.

The cops came and looked for clues,
and talked to everybody.
But everybody had been at church,
nobody had seen anything.

‘I suppose it’s a good thing nobody was home,’
said the officer.
‘But somebody was home!
Our little girl is sick,
she’s sleeping upstairs.’

The cops asked to speak to the young girl.
The young girl was feeling better,
but she still sniffed and snuffled
when she walked into the room.
And she wasn’t surprised to find out
the house had been burglarized.

‘Oh, yeah,’
she said.
‘I saw them.’

‘But you were sleeping!’
protested her mother.

‘I know,
but I saw them in my dreams.
I watched them take everything.’

One of the cops snorted.
The older one,
the chief,
merely said,
‘Tell me what you saw.’

So my grandmother’s younger sister
told of the crooks driving up,
how they looked around,
how they checked the house for people,
but stopped before they reached her room.
She then described,
step by step,
how the crooks went through the house,
what they took,
how they carried it out the front door.

At the end she said,
‘When they reached their car
one of the men turned around,
saw me looking out of my window,
and he waved to me.
Then he got in the car and they drove away.

The family figured the girl had been hallucinating,
had made up a dream to match what had happened.
The younger cop thought it was a crock.
The older cop asked her to describe the two men.
She did,
and the old cop said,
‘That’s those two boys living on the outskirts of town.’

The cops went off,
broke down the door of the shack the two men were living in
and arrested them.
All of the stolen goods were recovered,
except for a few pieces of silverware
that had already been melted down.

The two crooks confessed,
and their descriptions of their crime
matched everything the younger sister had said,
except for the waving of the hand at the end.
One of the crooks said,
‘I would wave at nobody I had just stole from!’

Now,
this story is absolutely true.
It happened to my grandmother,
who relayed it to my brother and sister and I.
A bit of the Case family lore.

So why do I tell you now?
Because there is something very important you should understand
if you are ever going to learn the truth of matrixing,
and the truth of the martial arts.

There is a sixth sense,
and there are abilities in your dreams,
and they exist,
but they only exist for you
if you believe that they can exist.
Don’t believe and you never get those abilities,
believe and you will find them.

I was raised in a family where we believed in such things,
in the power of imagination and hard work,
where people could have special abilities
if they worked hard enough.

Many of you out there know what I say,
you probably have your own family legends,
your own experiences in imagination and abilities.
But for those of you who are weak in such things,
read this story again,
and realize that this is the stuff of martial arts.

You can learn them fast,
you can have intuition,
you can be superior.
Really,
there is nothing that you can’t do.

You just have to believe.

Have a great work out!
Al

Tai Chi is great for developing intuition and abilities,
here’s the link, and below it a great win!

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/2ba-matrix-tai-chi-chuan/

A WIN!

Al,
Great news! I have been working with the Matrix Tai Chi basics performing each one dozens of times and holding the finished posture for three breaths each. This has made my Five Army form so much better! My power has increased in my karate forms as well. Just need to work on Shaolin Butterfly to get the basics down for the Bagua stuff. Well hope you’re having a great 2016 so far.
Justin

Finding the MMA Locks and Throws in Karate

Newsletter 940

Finding MMA Jointlocks in Karate

I teach at a school near my house.
The school is predominately MMA,
and I teach things like Karate, Kung Fu, Monkey boxing.
So how do I get away with it?
Let me tell you…

One day I was helping one of the mma instructors.
He’s showing takedowns and locks and such,
and then,
because he knows I have limited MMA,
he glances in my direction,
makes sure I am helping him in the right way.
I’m working with one of the students,
no problem,
Except there was a problem.
I had done the takedown,
but couldn’t figure out how to get to the lock.
The instructor is about to come over,
and suddenly I roll up the student’s body.
Just roll,
like sideways,
using my weight.
The student under me tries to push me back,
I alter a bit,
and zingo bingo,
I have myself a kimura.
The student under me slaps the mat.
The instructor says,
how did you do that?

huh,
isn’t that the best question in the world?
How did I do that?
We weren’t working on kimuras,
he hadn’t shown anybody kimuras,
and he mentioned that he had never seen anybody
apply a kimura like that.
You see,
in MMA,
which is heavy on Brazilian Jujitsu,
there are certain sequences you use
to get a kimura,
but I hadn’t used one of those sequences.
I had done something he had never seen before.

The way I did it was straight out of karate.
When somebody punches
you execute a downward crossed wrist block.
Then you push the wrist one way,
manipulate the elbow by placing a finger behind the elbow,
and snake into a kimura.
When the student had tried to push me back
I had treated it like a punch.

The other instructor thought my technique was great fun,
he practiced,
showed it to other instructors,
and,
of course,
he showed me the technique I should have done.
But here’s the thing:
we (karate, kung fu, whatever) have all the locks and throws
that are in MMA,
we just do them standing up.
They do them lying down,
Same lock.
But because mma usually does a takedown first
they sometimes don’t understand the version
where you lock while standing up.

Now I’m not making a statement,
I respect all arts,
there are blank spots in every art,
and that’s what makes it so much fun
to train with people from other arts.


The above link is an unlisted one,
it shows the lock I used.
Now it is a downward kimura,
not an upward one,
not an official ‘chicken wing,’
as it is sometimes called.
And,
to tell the truth,
I have no idea what the name is in other languages or arts.
Downward kimura?
upside down elbow lock?
Anyway,
it is part of the upcoming Monkey Boxing epic I am working on.
For the last couple of years I have been working on
a website,
a series of videos,
presenting Al Case Monkey Boxing.
Which is the world’s first complete and perfect
BRAND NEW martial art.
Sure,
you can make karate perfect,
or kung fu or whatever,
but this art,
ACMB,
is new from the ground up,
and I thought you might enjoy a taste of what is coming.

So far I’ve got over 200 videos presenting this art,
it will be the best video course
in the history of the martial arts.
VERY comprehensive.
And,
interestingly enough,
I’ve got 7 guys I have been showing it to.
They signed up for the MB vid course
a little over a year ago,
so the whole thing will be proofed by them
by the time it is released.

Anyway,
I thought I would show you one of the videos.
You can see that I am not interested in beating people up,
but rather teaching them.
Mechanically, scientifically, philosophically.
Enjoy,
and remember what I said earlier,
stand up arts have all the MMA locks and such,
but only if the instructor understands the difference
between standing up and laying down.

Have a great work out!

Al

This course is the original,
it will stay the same when I present
the whole Monkey Boxing art…

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/matrix-kung-fu/

A WIN WITH MONKEY BOXING IN IT!

I wanted to share this with you: this last Saturday I was in my Brazilian Jiujitsu class and it dawned on me. Many of the  submissions are similar to techniques from other arts. An arm lock in Jiujitsu is a block in Muay Thai, and a movement from Monkey Boxing is a lockdown (or pin) in Jiujitsu. Doing the Matrixing courses has begun to bring things together in a way I hadn’t ever noticed before. But it isn’t in a confusing way. It just fits.

Thanks,
Mylan B

The Difference Between a Martial Artist and Practicing the Martial Arts…

Newsletter 939

Translating Karate into Everything

Hey Guys and Gals!
I just wrote the following newsletter,
and I just wanted to say thanks to you guys,
for being martial artists,
and making my path so worthwhile.
Hope you enjoy…

I was a black belt in Karate when I started Aikido.
I always remember the shock on the Aikido black belt’s faces,
I had a question
and I would walk right up
and ask the question.
If you’ve ever been around the classical,
that’s not how you do stuff.
You bow and scrape.
You practice speaking in a subdued manner.
You treat yourself like a humble dope
so they will take pity on you.
But I was a black belt in karate,
I was equal,
be it in another system,
so I would walk up and break the etiquette,
I would just ask.
Funny thing,
they always answered my questions.
I suppose they couldn’t figure out how to say no,
without themselves looking like a doofus.
So one day I’m asking a question,
and this black belt blinks,
and realizes.
‘You’re a black belt.’
Yup.
Then he took me aside,
we traded stuff madly,
really got into the art.
But here’s the interesting thing:
in Karate,
when you get to black belt,
you start figuring out how to use specific forms in freestyle.
Sure.
You’re intuitive,
you start reading minds,
guy thinks about an attack,
you think about a defense from a form,
and they match.
Not like today when people just fight.
Now,
at black belt I wasn’t interested in that.
Did it,
but wasn’t interested.
I was already reading everything,
looking at other arts,
and I wanted to make other arts work.
Of course,
the big problem was that I hadn’t really studied other arts.
I had read about them.
Big problem.
So doing the Aikido class,
I began to realize that I was performing the same body motions,
but going with the opponent
instead of against.
Instead of colliding with an inward block,
if I did a quick step and made the in block go with the attack,
I had aikido.
Zingo Bingo!
Then I looked at Tai Chi,
figured out the concepts,
applied them to Karate motions,
and I was doing Tai Chi.
And,
yes,
it was that simple.
Everything translated if you understood the concept behind the art.
Went through a few Kung Fu systems.
Did weapons,
and so on.
Matrixing was born,
and I wrote a million words
to describe everything
so everybody could understand it.
Do you study one system?
Silly you.
With a few tweaks you could be studying all the martial arts.
Now,
there are a few things to look out for.

First,
most systems these days
have become so muddied
they don’t have specific concepts.

Second,
most systems don’t have the right blend of forms and freestyle,
they end up with two arts…
the art of whatever their forms are
and the art of freestyle.

Third
most systems don’t stick to the path long enough
to become intuitive.
They end up putting boxing into their training,
mixing in MMA so they can advertise,
and so on.
You can recognize these systems
because people describe by using such terms as /muscle memory.’
Muscle memory is what you have until you go intuitive,
then it’s a whole new ballgame.
Then you are in the now.
And that’s a very zen thing.

The thing is,
when you have a system that works,
you can’t go hunting and pecking through other systems,
you have to do your whole system,
then you have to understand the concepts of the other system,
and you have to understand how these concepts work by physics and mechanics.
Then you have to work your butt off.

When I was figuring this stuff out
I was working out several hours a day,
even if I had no partner.
I would do air forms,
pound the bag,
work with weapons,
and write everything I did down.
And,
therein lies the difference
between a martial artist,
and a fellow who practices the martial arts.
We all start out the same,
going to classes,
blindly groping.
The fellow who practices martial arts,
however,
stops.
The martial artist doesn’t stop.
He becomes more and more obsessive,
finding new things to obsess about,
compelled to learn new things,
always dissatisfied with his progress,
always knowing that the truth is right around the corner,
if he could just see…a…little…further.
Anyway,
that’s the path from Karate to Aikido to everything else.
It’s not an easy path,
if you measure it in bruises and hours,
but it is the easiest path if you are obsessed.
Here’s to you,
I hope you’re obsessed.

Have a great work out!

Al

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/matrix-aikido/

AN AIKIDO WIN!

Here’s a fellow who illustrates what I’ve been saying…

Hi,
Just wanted to take the time to thank you.  Having now watched and read through the Matrix Karate system it is exactly what I was hoping it would be when I originally made the purchase.  I have begun working my way through the material and am enjoying every second of it!  I have since also bought (I’ve been treating myself each pay day) your monkey boxing and within the last few days your Aikido course.  Both I have found instantly applicable, and although I have only watched the Aikido seminar once so far, I have quickly identified that together they are so much more than the sum of their parts!   Within just a few days of the monkey boxing course arriving, I found that I was suddenly able to lock and manipulate to restrain far higher grades than myself in the club I attend, and now have found I have members of all levels, and even my own instructor asking me to just go over techniques so they can see what I did.  Suffice to say that the guy (every club has one) that is like an immovable object was lying face down the very first time I tried a technique you had discussed… and I see no reason why my skills won’t take on a similar bound forward as I absorb the Aikido course.  
I am sure you hear such stories all the time from people like me (over enthused with what must seem mundane to yourself) but I really felt I ought to say thank you.  One thing I am not sure if other people have found, but I want to mention, I truly appreciate you laying ‘it all’ out for people, by which I mean I appreciate the reward  (in terms of knowledge) coming from hard work and ‘flight time’ rather than an arbitrary period between Dan Gradings no matter how often one trains in that time before the next chunk of knowledge is passed on.  I will continue to follow your courses and let each build on what went before.
One more thanks for the recommendation to read ‘As a man Thinketh’ I really took a lot from it.
Anyhow, I’ll leave you be, and stop pestering you with my ramblings.
Many thanks one last time,
Adam D.

Rules to Learn the Martial Arts

Newsletter 938

Martial Arts Rules to Live By

We are born and we don’t know the rules.
the result is that for the history of man
we have been making up rules

Over 4,000 years ago
Hammurabi set down his rules.
280 rules on 12 stone tablets.
These rules dealt with everything,
from contracts to murder.

Then there was Moses,
10 rules on two tablets.

And throughout history everybody has made up rules,
rules to trade,
rules for criminals and punishment,
rules for marriage.

In your martial art there are doubtless rules.
Funakoshi wrote that there were six rules.
then only gave us five.
My theory is that the missing third rule had to do with matrixing.
But maybe that’s just me.
Grin.

In the school I am currently teaching
we have rules.
The head sensei came across these rules somewhere,
and printed them up and posted them
on the front door of the school.
Just to let you know,
before I reveal the rules,
his school specializes in kids.
He has no problem with specialized needs.
We even have a girl who is blind.
Every kid in there gets to help her,
and they all love it.
And she is actually learning some good martial arts.
Anyway,
here are the rules he posted.

In this studio…
We do second chances
We apologize
We forgive
We respect each other
We keep our promises
We never give up
We encourage one another
We laugh often
We belong…

I find it interesting to compare these rules
with the rules of other schools,
with rules posted by Funakoshi,
Hammurabi,
or whoever.

Obviously,
these rules were crafted by somebody
who wanted to reassure parents,
maybe was a social justice warrior,
maybe not,
and that’s okay.

My rules are pretty simple,
I write about them occasionally,
especially in my books on Neutronics.
They include such things as…

‘Be polite.’

and…

‘For something to be true,
the opposite must also be true.’

There are lots of rules in the world,
but they usually come back to such things as these.
I believe in simplicity.
Life is simple,
there is right…or wrong.
A simple choice,
that doesn’t need a lot of explanation.

The thing is this…
if you want to know the rules,
work out harder.
The rules of life are self-evident.
Simple truths.
Only crooks make them difficult.

Anyway,
I recommend ‘Chiang Nan’ this week.

http://monstermartialarts.com/how-to-translate-karate-into-tai-chi-chuan/

This book holds my thoughts on the original karate form,
how to translate karate to Tai Chi,
and the techniques deliberately hidden by the old masters.

The reason is simple…
if the old masters really hid the real techniques,
they were likely breaking their own rules.
Either that,
or they hadn’t worked out hard enough
to understand the real rules of living
and of the martial arts.

Have a great work out!

Al

http://monstermartialarts.com/how-to-translate-karate-into-tai-chi-chuan/

WIN!

Here’s a couple of wins I received. What makes them interesting is that two different people came across my ‘Buddha Crane’ book, and they reached similar conclusions, and had a heck of a lot of fun doing it.
The Buddha Crane book is bundled into ‘how to create your own art,’ and also as a book on Amazon.

Hello sir.
It’s going well. Really well. Once I was able to connect Buddha crane with shuri ryu, the pieces began to fall into place all by themselves.
The Buddha crane is the foundation of the kihon waza, ippons waza and came into their own flow drills(taezus naru waza).
Making changes to the Kata isn’t as easy, but I have done the first few Kata. Even crazier, I found someone who has already blended shuri ryu with something. So, it came rather easy.
Upon showing him how I’ve made changes opened his eyes and he’s asking me to give him pointers on how to make his karate be more ‘alive’.
My shuri ryu master is dead and I never got the chance to get my black belt. So, I’ve gone thru these people I’ve run into and just from what I showed them they are willing to bring me to the black belt in shuri ryu.
I’m not sure if that’s even important now, being that I matrixed the whole art, but I do hope to bring this understanding of shuri ryu to the table. Thus, starting a new (sub) ryu to the family.
I couldn’t have done it without you. Osu ~ Timothy G

Master founder,
How are you doing. I hope all is well. Happy belated fourth. Been busy with creating the art to make it my own. Honestly, I’ve been  working on some things with the arts. Oh yeah, I found a way to matrix the shuri ryu style. Quite interesting to see an existing art turn into something really workable.
Thanks to you sir, I’ve gained an understanding of true art. What turned it to be a great help was Buddha Crane Karate. Some fine points in that book. ~ John L