Tag Archives: mma

The Fellow Who Stole the Martial Arts

The Good and the Bad of Stealing Martial Arts

I was teaching a class a few years ago,
probably the last big class I ever taught,
and it was a joy and I was in heaven.

Now, the way I teach
I go through the forms,
then the students pair up and I circle through them,
taking them through the next step in the form,
showing them exactly what it means.
This makes the form more and more real.
So they are practicing self defense,
real self defense techniques,
when they are practicing the forms,
and they are practicing the forms,
whenever they do self defense techniques.

It is an excellent way to impart reality in martial arts,
and to bridge the gap between
the perfection of theory
and the chaos of combat.

And,
it is a VERY fast method.
Maybe eight techniques in a form,
eight to ten classes,
that’s a month of twice a week classes,
12 forms in a year,
and the student is ready to move on to the next art.
My methods are fast and efficient,

So I was teaching the class,
went to one of the students and said,
‘Let’s take a look at the next technique.’
He said, ‘Joe taught me that one.’
I blinked.
And it turned out that Joe had taught him all the techniques,
and even the next two forms.
They had gotten together over the weekend, you see….
So I walked on.
And I thought about it.

Joe had taught him two forms,
about 15 techniques from the forms,
and he had done this fellow a real disservice.
The fellow now had all techniques second hand,
from a fellow who hadn’t worked them for more than a month or two.
And, he was now missing out on instruction
from a fellow with about 45 years of teaching experience,
he had the system,
but not the knowledge of what it was all about,
how it worked.
He didn’t have the ability to take the next step,
to do the next art,
because he had learned these techniques monkey see monkey do.
The fellow didn’t care.
Because he didn’t know.
Didn’t understand.
He didn’t understand that there was knowledge to be had.
He thought he had all the knowledge,
but all he had was a bunch of moves,
memorized in a weekend
without understanding how they worked,
how they fit together.

And, years later, I ran into this student again,
the one who had gotten all the tricks,
and he still didn’t know what had happened.
He had quit martial arts,
gone on to other things,
and,
he asked if he could study with me again.
He knew something was missing,
you see.
He didn’t know what.
He didn’t know that he was still seeking.
he thought he had it all,
but he was still looking,
still missing out on what I would have taught him.
And,
it was too late.
I couldn’t teach him,
he would have been bored,
disappointed,
wondered where the big mystery was.
Heck,
he knew that stuff,
so where was this big thing he was looking for?
And he will never understand
that the big teaching happened years ago,
and he was there,
and he missed it.
He missed it because he had asked somebody to teach him.
In essence,
right in the middle of class,
he had asked for another teacher.
And he had gotten one.
As fast as my teaching method was,
he was impatient,
thought he could learn on his own terms.

There are several lessons to be had from this incident.
You could say you have to
respect the teacher and respect the art.
And,
you could draw a conclusion about people who try to skip the line,
who are arrogant in their belief that they know it all.
And,
there is always the lesson about people being blind.

But what I think about is that the fellow quit.
Heck,
if he hadn’t quit,
if he had kept studying,
it would have worked.
It would have taken longer,
but he would have matured,
the art would have matured in him,
and he would have figured it out.
Might have taken him a few decades.
Might not.
He was a smart guy,
after all.

But here’s the thing…
it’s okay to get excited and grab what you can,
just don’t quit after you grab,
and here is the real lesson behind this guy.

For him it was like eating candy.
he grabbed it,
he ate it,
and then there was no more,
so he shrugged and walked away.

i mean,
he tried to eat it,
but he couldn’t,
without what I would have told him,
he just couldn’t ‘digest it,’
so he shrugged and walked away.

He’s still hungry for the ‘candy’ of the martial arts,
doesn’t know it,
but since he gorged himself once,
i know he missed the lesson,
and he’ll do it again,
so I can’t teach him.

Now,
it’s his fault,
but the fellow who taught…
it’s his fault, too.

Big disservice there.

Anyway,
no use crying over spilt milk,
life goes on,
and all I can say is that if you want to learn a system,
be prepared to practice that system for a year or two,
even if it is one of my fast methods,
you have to make sure that you get it,
that you are not just memorizing moves,
but getting the knowledge behind it all.

And,
most important,
if you want the knowledge behind the martial arts,
if you want to know the secrets behind the systems I put together,
if you want to know the concepts that make the real and true martial arts,
check out The Master Instructor Course.
The Master Instructor Course has the real reasons
behind the martial arts.

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/4-master-instructor-course/

You do this course,
and even if you gobbled the martial arts up like candy,
you will understand it all,
and you won’t walk away,
shrugging,
thinking that you got it all.

Okay ka dokely
and remember…

you can lead a horse to water,
but you can’t teach him to fish.
Only the horse can teach himself to fish,
but if horses could wish,
they’d all cast nets.

Got it?

Now have a great and wonderful work out.
Al

The Bigger Picture of the Martial Arts

Let me make a few martial arts connections here…

The secret of the martial arts
is that it gives you the discipline
to create more awareness.

This awareness occurs when you transform your art
from obsessing on things like explosions
and finding the silence in your art.
Loose-tight.
Tightening just the fist.
Becoming aware of the space of your body
and how different moving the space of your body is
from moving your body with muscles.

one year black belt

How long does it take to earn a black belt?

In Tai Chi I used geometry.
I became aware of the geometry
my hands made in each motion
and I focused my awareness
on being aware of my hands
throughout each geometry.
A curve,
an arc,
a transitioning spiral from one movement to the next,
staying aware as I did so.

Now, here’s the funny thing,
it all depended on not having corners in my motion,
not jerking,
or otherwise going unaware
in my motion.

The constant awareness
through each motion
became THE biofeedback device
that drove me forward.

As I did this,
as I accomplished more awareness
strange things happened.
I became aware of the various motors
that my body was composed of.

The motor of air to energy (chi)
separated by the diaphragm.
This lead to an understanding of how the body works
that isn’t anywhere in western culture,
and which understanding is obscured
by poorly defined Chinese terminology
when it is understood at all.

The motor of potassium and salt,
which define the cells of the body.
This led to a complete understanding
of such things as nutrition and diet,
that is available nowhere else.
Did you know that you can change
the nutritional values of food
merely by understanding this factor
and doing certain things in your martial exercises?

The motor of the brain
and how it has virtually nothing to do
with real thought.

Now, to be very forthcoming,
you need to get the basic elements of the martial arts functioning.
This means a complete understanding,
not just doing…but understanding why you are doing,
of such things as breathing, relaxing, grounding your weight, and so on.
Coordinated Body Motion, not spoken of at all by other martial arts,
is key to this process.
Then,
you have to understand concepts in specific arts you practice.
In aikido you have to create the same size sphere as your partner.
In Karate yoou have to reach intuition of movement.
In Tai Chi you can travel through the door
by creating geometries of energy,
and then using those geometries to make your awareness pure,
so that it never breaks.

And, you have to do these things,
understand the tradeoff between these concepts from art to art,
and how to Coordinate all of the concepts.

That is how you forge yourself through the martial arts.
And most martial arts merely have you ‘monkey see monkey do,’
never explaining the connections here,
how every thing is related and dependent.

Never explaining that the arts aren’t different,
only separated by people who don’t understand
how they fit together.

Kenpo and Aikido,
for instance,
share the same concepts,
but they are misaligned
and so appear to be different.
And the same is true for all arts.
Wing Chun and Karate.
MMA and Tai Chi.
Krav Maga and MCMAP.
All just different and dumbed down slices
of the one big and true art
that is the properly aligned and fit together of all arts.

Anyway,
didn’t mean to rant,
I tend to get excited that way.

I’ll be signing books at the Martial Arts Museum
in Burbank on OCT 18.
Hope to see you there.

Here’s an URL if you are interested in
checking out the Tai Chi Chuan aspect of the martial arts.

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/five-army-tai-chi-chuan/

Have a great work out!
Al

Perfect Martial Arts, Perfect Character, Perfect World

Perfect Martial Arts

Good Lord!
It’s 100 degrees
up here at Monkeyland,
and that’s in the shade!
Perfect work out weather.
That’s what it is.

The reason the martial arts are perfect
has to do with sweat.
First,
you sweat the body,
what that does is remove impurities,
gets rid of toxins,
makes your body a fit temple for the spirit.
I mean,
after you sweat,
you’re clean inside!

Now,
second reason,
and this is important.
The universe is a bunch of stuff flying around.
The better you handle the stuff flying around,
create and avoid collisions of stuff,
the better functioning you are.

A fist is flying at your face,
you learn to see it,
to be intuitive about it,
to handle it.
Then,
you leave the smaller universe of the dojo,
and apply those lessons you have learned
to the universe at large.
A boss comes at you with a question.
Did you complete that job
you were supposed to finish last night.

Well,
maybe,
maybe not,
but the idea of a boss,
even an angry boss,
is small compared to the idea
of a fist flying at your face.
So you answer,
you handle the flack,
you stay in the game.

A guy without martial arts
is going to blubber a lot,
whine,
moan,
think up excuses.

A guy with martial arts
is going to get the job done.
Simply,
he has been trained to get the job done.
To put aside people punching at you,
until you can deliver your own punch.

Now,
if the martial art you are training in is only fighting,
it will have minimal value.
It’ll still work,
but you’ll ‘stand on principle’
at the wrong time,
or you’ll get upset and push back.

If you have classical martial arts,
which are aimed at perfecting character,
then you won’t make a fight
out of a simple question,
you’ll just give the answer,
receive the praise or anger
and move on.

Do you see how simple it is?
How simple martial arts makes life?

Now,
a guy goes to school,
he learns some stuff,
but he doesn’t learn how to stand in front of anger,
face it down,
and keep going.
Instead,
he is taught to ‘get along,’
to be socially compliant.
Martial arts teaches you how to get along,
but it doesn’t sacrifice your character to do it.
It teaches you to stand up
to look your fellow man in the eye,
and get along without knuckling under.

And,
here’s something else to think about,
how many of your bosses know martial arts?
Or,
of all the bosses you have had,
how many knew martial arts?
The answer is probably that the better bosses you have had
all knew some kind of martial arts,
had trained in the martial arts at some time.

It’s true.

And here’s something scary.
How many politicians have done martial arts?
Heck,
not many.
And the reason is clear.
what martial artist wants to hang out with politicians,
with people who are known for being corrupt and dishonest?
And what corrupt person
would want to learn the martial arts?

Okay,
so what I am telling you here is clear.
Work out and purify yourself.
Learn to face and handle the punch or throw,
become so competent,
that your competence bleeds over
into your every day
work a day world.

Now,
here is the thing,
the martial arts have been improving the planet
for millenium.
As opposed to, say, politicians.
And,
why haven’t we been able to overcome
corruption and politics?
Because we haven’t learned fast enough.
We have learned only as fast as the politicians,
so we have been tied with them,
neither side winning,
and the ‘fight’ going on through the ages.

So,
matrix.
Speed up your learning.
Learn something that is incorruptible,
that will make you stronger and smarter
at a faster rate,
faster than politicians can dumb down schools.

That is a solution,
and it is fun at the same time.

Look,
we can have a better world,
but we have to commit ourselves,
deal with the corruption,
refuse it in our own souls,
and refuse to put up with it
in the souls of others.

So…
Matrix.
And…
work out!

Check out
The Master Instructor Course.

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/4-master-instructor-course/

It gives you the data
to make your form perfect,
your techniques perfect,
and that will ell perfect your character.

Have a great work out!
Al

Making the Four Decisions of Martial Arts Freestyle!

Winning at Martial Arts Freestyle

To be victorious while using martial arts in a fight it is necessary to make the decision to win the fight. Without that decision, simply, there is no way you are going to become victorious in freestyle, or kumite. Thus, you have to practice making the decision, and then implement a plan so that the decision becomes reality in your martial arts freestyle.

martial arts course

Amazing new book! click on the cover!

There are five decisions you must make to back up the decision to win a fight. This combat strategy is found in every fight. This is the strategy you must understand and master if you are going to be able to deliver the original decision.

The first decision, and the most important, is that there is going to be a fight. Interestingly, you don’t have to get in a fight if you refuse to make the decision to be in a fight. Even if the other person has made a decision, unless you agree with his decision, you don’t have to fight.

The second decision involves distances involved in the fight. You should understand , at this point, that a fight is going to collapse in distance. And, you must understand that if you can control this distance, and even change collapsation into expansion at will, you can control and win a fight.

The third decision has to do with which side of the bodies the fight is going to occur on. One out of eight people being left handed, a fight will usually occur with right hand, and the bodies will turn to fit the hands, and the fight will be on that side. If you can control that decision, as to which side the fight will be on, then you are going to win that fight.

The fourth decision is going to be whether you are on the inside or the outside. What this means is that if he punches with a right hand, you must block/push/whatever so that his right hand misses you on the outside, and you see the inside of his wrist. And, if he punches with the right, you must block/push/whatever so that his right hand misses you on the inside, and you see the outside of his wrist.

There are other decisions in a fight, there can be millions of decisions, literally. Do you wish the fight to be conducted at a specific distance, such as foot, or fist, or elbow, or whatever. Or, do you wish to control the decisions so that the fight collapses or expands in distance as you wish, from foot to elbow to knee to throw to fist to foot to whatever, your choice, and so on.

The point, however, is that to control all the other decisions, you must control the first four decisions. If you can understand and create drills to back up these decisions, then you can win any fight. Of course, as I said in the beginning, the first decision, that you are going to win that fight, is the most important.

The Matrix Karate course will enable you to figure out ALL the decisions one has to know how to make in a fight.

How to Stay Grounded in the Martial Arts

Sunday Morning and the Martial Arts!

My day of …work out.
On the seventh day he…worked out?
Something to think about, eh?

But,
remember,
you don’t get where you’re going
by being a lazy so and so.
You get there by being
a lean, mean, work out machine.

martial arts poetry

Neutronic concepts in verse…click on the cover!

So,
where are you going?
There are stages of development,
you know.

First stage,
how do you tie a belt,
oh, forgot to bow,
how do I remember what to do.
Man, this is a LOT of work!

Then you get to black belt.
Lot’s of signposts before then,
but it’s still one stage,
reaction time disappears,
intuition appears,
and you absorb some mighty powerful stuff.

Second stage,
what the heck do I do now?
Do I practice this one art?
Work my way up the higher belt levels?
Do I sample other arts?
What do I do about this attack of pride
that seems to have lodged in my soul?

Third stage,
what the heck is this all about?
Do you see the progression here?
It is all about finding answers.
First you want to fight,
then you want to learn,
and it’s always about making decisions,
finding your way,
accumulating data until…?

If you are in an art that is competition oriented,
your progress is often truncated
when you get to old to compete.

If you are in an art with no roots,
an eclectic art,
then you either go away,
or you start searching for roots.
Lot of Kenpo people get involved with this one.
I was heavily there,
back in 69.

Some people make the transition
from learning
to teaching.
This is good,
because you actually learn more when you teach.
BUT,
there are some very serious roadblocks here.
Have you answered enough questions in your own mind,
to answer questions in others minds?
Are you teaching because you love the art?
Or because you love the domination?
This is a hard one,
especially considering what the martial arts are:
a discipline for dominating.
But teaching,
real teaching,
is different.
It is not about dominating,
it is about sharing.
Makes it hard to balance discipline with having fun.
Love of teaching is not enough.
Many instructors fall into this category,
they love to teach,
and they aren’t very good martial artists,
but the authority of the position
is very magnetic.
Electric.
A close cousin to domination,
without realizing it.

The problem here
is that nobody really knows how to teach.
They monkey see monkey do
how they were taught.
They follow the same method
that has been used for thousands of years.
A method designed for people
who weren’t literate,
who had no logic.
And they do this
even though the system they are teaching
is being degraded by all manner of influences,
including and sometimes especially
modern teaching methods.

I got lucky.
I studied with a fellow who didn’t talk.
He smiled,
he laughed,
he offered no opinion
just let us learn.
He didn’t inject himself into the teachings.
I studied for near seven years,
In that time he said maybe a dozen things.

‘A tight fist is a heavy fist.’

‘There are many paths to the top of the mountain.’

And so on.

Honestly,
I don’t remember the things he said,
I remember the feeling when he stepped on the mat,
the electrical current running up my legs.
I remember stepping on the mat myself
and suddenly being swept up
in a desire to work out
that was unlike anything
I had ever experienced.

Nobody ever dominated,
because he never dominated.

Nobody ever got lost in odd explanations of why this technique worked because of the neural synapsis that fired when the fight or flight syndrome was engaged because of the direction of the attacker’s eyes when…

All we did was the forms,
and we tried things,
and when the things didn’t work,
he was there to show us what did work.

That was the essence of the education,
you know,
to find out what worked.

When you find out what works
it answers all questions.
When you are lost in explanations offered
by people who want to be teachers,
or fighters,
or something other than martial artists,
then you end up thinking that the things that don’t work
will work.
The whole class skews.
The art skews.

When you get the explanation for what works,
by being directed to do the form,
and to find out what works,
then you learn the art.
And,
then you aren’t swayed into mystique land
or lost in the illogics,
or lose your roots.

Your roots are you.
After you do the forms
the way they are supposed to be done,
in silence and looking for what works,
then you answer your questions,
there are no more mysteries,
and you are left with you.

A greater blessing has no man.

Anyway,
thanks for letting me rant,
hope it helps.
And there is always
The Master Instructor Course,
if you need a little extra
in the way of instruction.
Works for every student,
every teacher,
because it is grounded in how the universe actually works
and it is rooted in the truth of you.

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/4-master-instructor-course/

Now,
have a great Sunday,
or whatever day you get this on.
Remember,
any day can be a day of rest…
any day can be a day of work out.

Have a great work out!
Al

Do vs Jitsu in the Martial Arts

To Fight or not to Fight

The following is a guest editorial from Alaric Dailey

Being a student of traditional Karate-Do, when I make mention to a school owner or martial artist or parent of a child taking classes somewhere that “martial arts is more than punching and kicking, there is more to being a martial artist than simply being a fighter” I get a blank stare. At this point, I have to explain the following.

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A tale of the Wudan Assassin…click on the cover!

These days, tradition is often poo-pooed with some comment like “if it doesn’t make me a better fighter than I don’t care”.   But being a fighter doesn’t make you a good person, in fact, simply knowing how to fight can make you arrogant, or worse, a bully.

This is often evidenced in “fighter” gyms, people walking around with bad attitudes, all about testosterone and ego, injuries abound because people are always trying to prove they are the king of the mountain.

The way of the warrior, Bushido, is about being a gentle soul, learning not only to punch and kick, but to help others, to be calm and humble.

In other words, learning all those “useless” things, like the language, the manners, the meditation, the discipline, reciting Dojo-kun are not useless, they are about expanding your mind, and making you more than a fighter.

In my original dojo, my sensei not only give us the meditation and such, but would also tell us stories of the Samurai, and give us pieces of Bushido that most westerners never hear.  “Ikebana (flower arranging) is a great way to clear your mind”, and “self-defense is not just about punching and kicking, it is about avoiding and defusing danger in the first place” were words of wisdom that we often heard from sensei.

When the Japanese would teach an art, they would distinguish whether or not it included only fighting techniques, or would give you “the way”.  If you have “the way” it is a Do, Karate-Do, Ju-Do, Aiki-Do, etc.  If it is purely fighting techniques it was Jitsu, Karate-jitsu, Ju-jitsu, Aiki-jitsu, and Nin-jitsu.

As a side note here, you will notice there is no such thing as a “Do” for Ninja fighting techniques.  This is because the ninja weren’t fighters, they were assassins, their skills included, poisons, escape, evasion, not being seen, killing techniques etc.   Being a hired killer, and being a better person have nothing to do with each other.

There are 7 virtues
Rectitude (義 gi)
Courage (勇 yū)
Benevolence (仁 jin)
Respect (禮 rei)
Honesty (誠 makoto)
Honour (名誉 meiyo)
Loyalty (忠義 chūgi)

and 3 more associated virtues
Filial piety (孝 kō)
Wisdom (智 chi)
Care for the aged (悌 tei)

I see it as a great loss that so many have thrown away history and tradition, the Do, in favor of the more testosterone fueled (and MMA fanned) jitsu.  It is a sad state of affairs that our children grow up idolizing real and fictional people who push the ideas “might makes right” and “the ends justifies the means”, never once mentioning justice and mercy.

I highly recommend “The Hagakure”.

Check out the Karate Katas that work.

A Terrorist, You, and ONE Martial Arts Technique!

What Fight Ender Would You Use Against a Terrorist?

Okay, if you’re a politically correct soccer mom, go away. The girls are pulling your precious Johnny’s pants down and laughing at him.

BUT, if you’re not too delicate of heart, let me ask you a question. Here’s the build up…

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The Ultimate Karate Encyclopedia!

You’re on an elevator. You are staring at your cell phone. There is a picture of a terrorist, and he is the fellow standing next to you!

Your heartbeat escalates, sweat bursts out on your forehead.

He isn’t holding a dead man’s switch, but you know, from the bulge of his belly that he is wearing a vest with explosives!

If you give him a chance, he’ll grab that switch, and that elevator will be on the fast track to hell!

He glances over at you, sees his picture on the cell, and now you know you must move. You know who he is…and he knows you know!

…so there it is. You have time for one, and only one technique. It has got to be a fight ender. You can’t risk him falling down half aware and reaching into his pocket for the dead man’s switch. You have to take him out now!

All the way out!

No second chances!

So what technique are you going to use? Describe it in detail, tell us where it comes from.

It can be from any martial art, or not from a martial art. You can only use weapons that a person might carry on his person and not get busted, and which you, yourself, normally carry.

He can have similar weapons, cause that’s only fair, right?

And, be careful, anything you say will be dissected endlessly, and you just know that some of them cruel Beavis and Butthead types are just waiting to mock you all the way to Bullshido!

So, how are you going to save the world? What technique are you going to use?

Well?

This question posed courtesy of MonsterMartialArts(dot)com!

(Have you checked out The Ultimate Karate Encyclopedia?)

The End of the World and the Martial Arts

What Martial Art Would You Study if The World Ended?

I will talk about the end of the world towards the end of this newsletter,
but I really want to start just by talking about
an old movie I was watching the other day,
an old classic from the eighties called
‘Heroes of the East.’
You might recognize it from a different title,
Challenge of the Ninja,
or Shaolin against Ninja,
or something like that.

In it
a young Chinese master gets married,
and his wife is Japanese,
and she is tearing the house apart
by kicking and punching everything
from walls to statues,
and the young master tries to get her to stop.
That leads to misunderstandings
which lead to a score of Japanese masters
coming to China
and challenging the young master.

Now,
on the surface,
it is Chinese arts are better than Japanese arts.
Which they had to do
because it was a Chinese film.
But,
it is done so delightfully,
so tongue in cheek,
and the hero,
Gordon Liu,
ends up making friends with all,
and everybody agreeing that all arts should be shared
and people should get past their misunderstandings
and get along.

Now,
Gordon Liu,
if you recall,
is a Chinese film star
who is actually a real Shaolin Master.
And in an interview on the disk
he talked about getting along
with the Japanese masters
and what it was like to work out with these guys
and how they all learned so much from each other.

They didn’t even speak the same language,
but they managed to have the time of their lives,
and to communicate on VERY deep levels
just by doing the martial arts.

So,
here’s something to think about
when you think about martial arts masters,
the real ones want to keep learning.

They don’t tear each others arts apart,
they ask questions
and trade techniques,
and keep learning.

One of my favorite stories came from
the daughter of Dong Hai Chuan
the founder of Pa Kua Chang.

Common stories had him fighting
the founder of Tai Chi Chuan for three days,
-imagine that,
fighting for three days,
without getting tired.
Hmmm.-
but she said that their house
always had visiting martial artists
sitting around
talking and exchanging ideas,
every once in a while one of them showing a technique,
and the others offering suggestions,
and analysis.

Not fighting.

Rather,
thinking about
and talking about,
and…
sharing.

I remember when I was learning Kenpo,
and the teachers encouraged such thought as,
our belts were always one belt better than…
insert the name of another school here.

And,
Shotokan practitioners
were looked down on
as mindless robots
with their endless three step punching drills.

And,
kung fu was too flowery
-that from kenpo,
who have the biggest flowery,
circular hands theory
in the world!

And
judo was only good for sport,
and only a fool would allow himself
to be taken to the ground,

And,
what good was kendo
because you can’t carry a sword with you
on the street.

And…
you get the drift.

Now,
this wasn’t a bad kenpo school,
it was actually pretty good,
with a VERY good martial artist
at the head.

But,
there is money to be made,
if you can convince people
that other schools are bad,
and yours is good,
and it all starts from your own students,
and selling them a bill of goods.

And,
if you think kenpo is the worst in this,
think again,
my favorite bad mouthing
of all time,
is the Japanese stylist who claimed
that western people couldn’t learn karate
because it took three lifetimes.

Uh,
yeah.
Two more to go for me,
right?

So,
have we dispensed with this ignorance?

Not quite.

The good thing is that students are loyal to their school.
This is a good quality.

The bad thing is that they are so loyal
they refuse to look outside their school.

If the martial arts had stayed the same,
and everything was closed combat,
and systems stayed pure,
and represented the actual evolution
and accumulation of art
over decades,
then maybe I would say don’t go outside your school.

But,
the arts have changed,
and the closed combat systems are not so pure anymore,
so if you are going to make it
you have to learn, learn, learn.

Look everywhere.

Read every book.

Watch every movie,
every video,
go to demonstrations,
meet people,
learn,
and be willing to trade martial arts
with the most polite and inquiring mind
you can have.

Okay,
let’s talk about the title to this newsletter,
Martial Arts and the end of the world.

If the united states fell,
was invaded,
suffered civil war,
what martial art would you use
to defend yourself,
to take into the new world order?

It’s an interesting question,
isn’t it?

Up front,
I would wish I had the discipline of a classical martial art.
The fact is that discipline,
of itself,
enables one to exist through anything,
to survive,
and to get better.

Discipline is the gold here.

But,
if we are talking about choosing a single art
to make work against soldiers or mobs,
in any situation and against any weapon,
then I always go to Blinding Steel.

Now,
Blinding Steel is the name of the course,
but…what is it actually?

Blinding Steel came about because of
one of the first things I ever matrixed,
Matrix Kung Fu.

You’ve read the story
of how i laid thousands of business cards
with all the techniques I knew
on the backs of them
across my living room.
I had techniques from half a dozen systems of Kenpo,
several systems of Pa Kua,
aikido,
all sorts of kung fu,
and LOT of good, old Karate,
tons of tai chi,
and so on.

And I sorted through this mess,
drove myself near insane,
and finally saw the truth of the martial arts,
and finally had my big matrixing break through.

Now,
Matrix Kung Fu
is a study of joint locks,
and
it is the ABCs of takedowns.
Trip and throw,
lock and slam,
it is the world’s first look
at how to scientifically arrange
stand up takedowns.

In a way,
there is a heavy kenpo influence,
but…
without the Kenpo.

Odd, eh?

But,
here‘s the thing,
I didn’t provide for entry techniques.

Don’t get me wrong,
each technique has a way to enter the throw or takedown,
but
there is no way to set up a master flow
that will enable you to move into any of the techniques.
A little experience,
and you can figure things out,
a little work,
and you can make it work in any situation.

But,
I wanted more.
I wanted to include weapons,
and I wanted to include distances,
and methods of attack
that led into the throws.

By the oddest quirks
I had amassed an assortment of techniques
which didn’t seem to fit into matrixing.
But I kept working,
and I was into analyzing and matrixing
Indonesian weapons systems,
and it hit me,
and I saw how I had been playing in a different culture,
and how I could put it all together.

So Blinding Steel is an analysis,
a matrix,
of Indonesian systems,
that use weapons,
go into hands,
and slide into takedowns.

And,
here is the rub,
just as Matrix Kung Fu was good,
but I wanted to expand it to include more,
The Blinding Steel was phenomenal,
but there was no deep analysis of throws
on the end of it.

So the two went together,
hand in glove.

And I had started by called one of them Matrix Kung Fu
because I had matrixed throws that were very kenpo in nature,
and I had named the other Blinding Steel
as a great name for a study of weapons,
but,
together,
I called them
‘Monkey Boxing.’

This because I used to do them
while listening to a lot of Bob Marley type music
and moving more like a monkey,
especially on the set up and entry.

So,
if I had one art to take into the end of the world,
and I had little time to learn it,
but I wanted it deep
and able to encompass a LOT of martial arts,
it would be
Matrix Kung Fu
and Blinding Steel.

Matrix Kung Fu is $25
we are talking instant download here.

Blinding Steel is $35.
Again,
I am talking instant download here,
this deal isn’t for the physical disks,
I live on a mountain top
and it is hard to get to the post office,
so,
if you want ten bucks off the instant downloads,

Go to:

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/4ab-blinding-steel-package/

Now,
remember,
this is an INCREDIBLY FAST system.
You get weapons,
and you get the transition to empty hands,
and you get the COMPLETE data
on how to matrix those empty hands
into the throws and takedowns of Matrix Kung Fu.

A complete system
which teaches you how to make a weapon out of anything,
and how to disarm anything,
and it is the FASTEST course I actually have.
It is so darned logical,
but,
more important,
it puts a logic
into ‘flowing.’

Okay,
there you go.
My good deed for the day,
and I sure hope the world doesn’t end,
but,
if it does
you will have the means to survive
and to bring the highest quality martial arts
in the whole wide world
into a brand new future.

Okay,
you guys and gals have a MOST glorious day,
check out that movie if you can,
Heroes of the East,
make sure you talk to other martial artists,
and trade data
so that you both learn,
and don’t forget,
Ten bucks off
on the Blinding Steel package.

Have a great work out!

Al

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/4ab-blinding-steel-package/

The Work Out Before Christmas!

Hanakwanmass!

(Hanuka/Kwanza/Christmas)

Budo means ‘to put down the spear.’
So whoever you are,
wherever you are,
work out long and hard,
so you can put down the spear
and hug your fellow man.

One of the things that newbies don’t think of,
they are so immersed in their studies,
is what is martial arts good for
after the mat.

It is so much fun to fight,
that they don’t think about the discipline they are building,
and the increased awareness,
and it takes them a while
to figure out what martial arts are good for.

So let me ask you the question…
have you picked up a musical instrument
since you began martial arts?
Or put some poetry down on paper?
Or taken classes in school?
Or done something else that requires
discipline, awareness,
patience,
whatever virtue you possess?

One of the things I enjoy is Haiku.
Haiku is a form of poetry,
requires extreme discipline,
and you end up with something like…

the frog on the pad
sees the moon in the water
kills it in one jump

And you think about life before you became aware of it,
whether a frog has awareness
what the moon looked like to that frog
before he attacked it.

This type of thought
is so much more fulfilling
than tweeting.

This type of thought fills your soul,
instead of emptying it.

So make a Hanakwanmass Haiku,
if you will.
Something about a tree
an ornament
a work out
a sword
a present
or…?

And think about how you are going to use
that delicious discipline you are building.

think about music
or writing
or painting
or whatever.

How can you express all that discipline and awareness
once you walk off the mat?

Okey dokey,
I know you’ve got family a waiting,
presents to open,
but make sure you take the time to visit the monster.

A glitter of electrons,
a computer present,
jump in.

Hanakwanmass to all!
And a durned fine work out, too.

Al

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/2f-matrixing-the-master-text/

PS
following is my annual seasonal poetry.
Read it wisely.

TWAS THE NIGHT BEFORE CHRISTMAS!

Twas the night before Christmas
I was in my shack
primed and ready
for the red fat attack.

my weapons were loaded
the windows were barred
all would be safe
while I was on guard

The chimney was decked
with concertina wire
I crouched by the couch
ready to fire.

I had an M60
with ammo to feed
I didn’t care
if the red fat did bleed.

A loaded shotgun
and grenades to spare
when red fat came down
I’d blow him out of there.

Throwing stars and knives
and a really long sword
and if that didn’t work
I knew a bad word.

Sitting there late
my eyes started to close
when suddenly I heard
a bunch of ho hos.

Off with the lights
safety off, too
I  watched the fire close
and heard a sound from the flu.

‘Ouch and gosh darn it
who put the wire here
those are my undies
starting to tear!’

Then a shower of soot
and a grunt and a groan
he landed in the fire
and gave out a moan.

He was rubbing the place
where the wire did tear
so I held down the trigger
and lead filled the air.

belt after belt
did I deal the red fat
he danced and he jumped
I knew he felt that!

then quicker than spit
I ran out of lead
but enough was enough
he had to be dead.

Boy was I shocked
to see him stand tall
stepping out of the fireplace
not bothered at all.

So I grabbed up the 16
to mow him down
he had to be hurting
cause I saw his big frown.

Then I was empty
and he came straight for me
I pulled out my knives
and sliced him with glee

He jumped to the side
moving real quick
disarmed my knives
with a well placed kick

then he dropped the big bag
he had on his shoulder
reached forth his arms
and his anger did smolder

He grabbed hard my neck
and held me up high
I tried kicks and punches
but I was like a fly

Not karate nor judo
no art did work
and he grinned a mean grin
and called me a jerk

‘Don’t you know
you stupid little man
Christmas is forever
in spite of your plan.’

Then he threw me aside
and proceeded to work
giving presents to all
and to me a great smirk

And when he left
the great big red fat
he left me a lump of coal
the big red fat rat!

HANAKWANMASS TO ALL

and to all
have a great work out.

Al
=o)

The Problem with Split Timing in Martial Arts

Split Timing Improves Martial Arts Freestyle

When I say split timing in the martial arts I am talking about somebody punching, and you coming in over the punch.

Not reacting, but going through the door at the same time he has, but with better angles.

This is actually the kind of thing that Bruce Lee taught. You can see Anderson Silva doing it in his fights. the other guy punches, and Anderson is not blocking and punching, but rather slipping and punching right over or around the other guys punch.

Classical martial arts trains with block and counter methods, which is not split timing, but a definite tick, tick, tick of the clock. This is reaction timing, or reaction training.

The problem is that reaction, to react, is to when you move because of something else, and it means he did something, he made an action, which caused your action. But that means that you are fighting after the other guy. You are always playing catch up.

And the problem is that this type of training method is prevalent in MMA, or Mixed Martial Arts. You will see fighters in strikeforce or the UFC, and they will punch after the other fellow punches. That puts them a full count behind. they need to split the count,to split the timing,and punch while the door is open.

Let the other guy open the door, but punch at the same time, or right over, but with better angles.

The reason this is so difficult to get is because of the reaction timing built into so many training methods.

But those methods are for beginners.

Advanced is split timing.

Advanced is not reaction, but seeing what is going to happen, and ating before, or at least in concert with.

When the other guy goes to punch, you should already be in motion. You should have seen the lean of the body at the very least, and, if you are an advanced martial artist, then the lean of his mind.

If you do the classical methods long enough you will see the though happen before the action. Once you see it, once you have reached a point of awareness where you see what is going to happen, you have to construct striking methods that take advantage of the window of opportunity.

This is one of the things that is possible through matrixing. Through making the art logical, the person can better reach the point of awareness of seeing what is going to happen before it happens.

He can move out of reaction time and into time ‘inside the moment.’

Not after, but before, or, at least, during.

If you are interested in developing this advanced freestyle ability, if you want to learn how to strike during or before your opponent’s strike, you should look for Martial Arts courses which have ‘lop sau’ in them, such as Matrix Kung Fu or the Shaolin Butterfly.