Tag Archives: mixed martial arts

Boxing, Mixed Martial Arts, and Reality

Is there a Disconnect in Boxing and Mixed Martial Arts?

Boxing and Mixed Martial Arts? A disconnect? Something tells me I should stop right now, before people get mad at me.

Click on the cover to find the source of the martial arts...

Click on the cover to find the source of the martial arts…

Except, there might actually be something in the question.

When you box, or perform Mixed Martial Arts, you wear gloves. You don’t wear such gloves on the street.

When you do the ‘Sweet Science,’ or battle in the Octagon, there are ‘fences,’ which means a cage, or ropes, to enclose the fight. There are no such barriers in real life.

When you are down, there is a referred to save you. No ref on the streets, bro.

When you fight in a public venue, such as i have mentioned here, the rounds end and you have a chance to recoup in your corner. No end of round, no corner, no recoup on the street.

I know, this is all unfair, I’m picking on your favorite gladiatorial sports.

Except, I’m not.

Look, I’m not saying these things are bad, I’m just saying they are.

The real disconnect is when you train for things that are, and they might not be. If that makes sense.

The real disconnect, when you study boxing or the Mixed Martial Arts, is merely the ability to break away from your training when you have to.

Training is to enhance the martial artist, it is not to imprison him.

So don’t object to what I say, just consider it, and come up with plans for times when you have to defend yourself and you are not in the ring, in the Octagon, doing Mixed Martial Arts or Boxing.

If you want a real slice of reality, check out ‘Binary Matrixing in the Martial Arts.’

And, if you want real training for reality, check out ‘Blinding Steel.’

Al Case has been studying martial arts for 50 years.

The Rundown on the Rhonda Defeat!

Newsletter 785
Rhonda!

Happy Thanksgiving!
I give thanks for many things,
I give thanks for working out,
and what working out does for me.

Who would have thought,
in these robotic,
wartorn,
poverty stricken times,
there would be such a unique and fun way
to find personal responsibility
and martial excellence?

Before we talk martial arts,
I want to share a thought.
I was sitting somewhere,
working on my laptop,
and I had this thought.
So I emailed it to myself,
and it’s been sitting there,
and thanksgiving is a good time to share it. Here we go:

Your duty is to observe the universe, to listen to both sides, to never take a stand against one side or the other, until the truth pops out. The truth is not a viewpoint or opinion, it is merely what is.

Now,
let’s talk martial arts.

It was a shock when Rhonda got knocked out.
And I don’t understand why it was a shock,
because it was inevitable.
It was inevitable as soon as Joe Rogan claimed that
Rhonda wasn’t once in a lifetime,
she was once in history.
It seems that we finally got the ultimate ‘adjective.’
Not star,
not superstar,
not once in a lifetime,
but once…ever.

As soon as I heard that I knew Rhonda was going to lose.
I just knew.

Part of it is that when you listen to fighters
and they describe what they are going to do to their opponent,
they are living in a fantasy.

‘I’m going to do this.’
‘My striking is superior and he can’t match my grappling.’
‘I’m going to pound his face into the floor.’
I know,
when I hear this sort of thing,
that the fighter is in his own mind,
trying to psyche himself up,
but it is a lost cause.

There is just a hollow feeling,
a ‘spirit-less’ feeling,
to such words said before a fight.

The winner,
on the other hand,
doesn’t boast about what he is going to do.
He is serious.
He has no fantasy distracting him.

Here’s the weird thing:
Rhonda didn’t say such a thing,
it was Joe Rogan.
But it was so unique,
and everybody was so pro-Rhonda,
I just knew she about to fall.

Now,
here’s the thing:
when people think they are the best,
there is no place to go but down.
When they are serious,
and look at each fight as a challenge,
a mountain to climb,
there is no where to go but up.

Rogan,
with his statement,
left Rhonda no where to go but down.

I don’t say Rogan made her lose,
there was just a predict in his words.
There was a summation
of the position that the world put Rhonda in.

Tell the truth,
she is probably going to be more alive,
more determined now,
than she was before.
Now she can climb again.
Now she can go up.

Now,
the fight itself.

Rhonda tried to box a better boxer.
Holly is a champion boxer,
Rhonda apparently had a fantasy of trying to outbox a boxer,
so she didn’t go to the ground.

I think everybody agrees,
Rhonda would beat Holly on the ground.

What a miscalculation on Rhonda’s part.

And,
what will she do next time?
Will she work on her boxing game?
Of course.
But the heart of her strategy
should be her ground game.
How to avoid Holly’s fist
get under it,
and take that girl down.

Truth,
I watched Rhonda simply run into Holly’s fat fist time after time,
and I cringed with each impact.

Man,
Rhonda can take it.
But it was not smart.
It would have been a lot smarter to assess the distances involved,
and respect Holly as a champ in her own right.

Here’s the truth:
we all strive to be the best we can be.
To strive to beat somebody else,
however,
is only a partial proof,
for it comes at the cost of another human being.
The true art is being the best you can be
without beating somebody else.

Weird,
eh?

That said,
I watch the fights,
I learn from them,
and I appreciate them.
With all my talk,
one has to appreciate the measuring stick.

Okay,
nuff said.

Go to this course for the complete data
on how to assess distance in a fight.

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/matrix-kung-fu/

And,
have a lot of great turkey,
make up for your gluttony with lots of work outs,
and here;s looking forward to…

Hanakwanmass!

Have a great work out!
Al

BTW – Thanks to you guys who wrote in and stated that you were part of The Fifty. You certainly are, and thanks.

Sign up for this newsletter at MonsterMartialArts.com.

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/matrix-kung-fu/

http://www.amazon.com/Matrixing-Tong-Bei-Internal-Gung/dp/1507869290/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1423678613&sr=8-1&keywords=tong+bei

The Fellow Who Stole the Martial Arts

The Good and the Bad of Stealing Martial Arts

I was teaching a class a few years ago,
probably the last big class I ever taught,
and it was a joy and I was in heaven.

Now, the way I teach
I go through the forms,
then the students pair up and I circle through them,
taking them through the next step in the form,
showing them exactly what it means.
This makes the form more and more real.
So they are practicing self defense,
real self defense techniques,
when they are practicing the forms,
and they are practicing the forms,
whenever they do self defense techniques.

It is an excellent way to impart reality in martial arts,
and to bridge the gap between
the perfection of theory
and the chaos of combat.

And,
it is a VERY fast method.
Maybe eight techniques in a form,
eight to ten classes,
that’s a month of twice a week classes,
12 forms in a year,
and the student is ready to move on to the next art.
My methods are fast and efficient,

So I was teaching the class,
went to one of the students and said,
‘Let’s take a look at the next technique.’
He said, ‘Joe taught me that one.’
I blinked.
And it turned out that Joe had taught him all the techniques,
and even the next two forms.
They had gotten together over the weekend, you see….
So I walked on.
And I thought about it.

Joe had taught him two forms,
about 15 techniques from the forms,
and he had done this fellow a real disservice.
The fellow now had all techniques second hand,
from a fellow who hadn’t worked them for more than a month or two.
And, he was now missing out on instruction
from a fellow with about 45 years of teaching experience,
he had the system,
but not the knowledge of what it was all about,
how it worked.
He didn’t have the ability to take the next step,
to do the next art,
because he had learned these techniques monkey see monkey do.
The fellow didn’t care.
Because he didn’t know.
Didn’t understand.
He didn’t understand that there was knowledge to be had.
He thought he had all the knowledge,
but all he had was a bunch of moves,
memorized in a weekend
without understanding how they worked,
how they fit together.

And, years later, I ran into this student again,
the one who had gotten all the tricks,
and he still didn’t know what had happened.
He had quit martial arts,
gone on to other things,
and,
he asked if he could study with me again.
He knew something was missing,
you see.
He didn’t know what.
He didn’t know that he was still seeking.
he thought he had it all,
but he was still looking,
still missing out on what I would have taught him.
And,
it was too late.
I couldn’t teach him,
he would have been bored,
disappointed,
wondered where the big mystery was.
Heck,
he knew that stuff,
so where was this big thing he was looking for?
And he will never understand
that the big teaching happened years ago,
and he was there,
and he missed it.
He missed it because he had asked somebody to teach him.
In essence,
right in the middle of class,
he had asked for another teacher.
And he had gotten one.
As fast as my teaching method was,
he was impatient,
thought he could learn on his own terms.

There are several lessons to be had from this incident.
You could say you have to
respect the teacher and respect the art.
And,
you could draw a conclusion about people who try to skip the line,
who are arrogant in their belief that they know it all.
And,
there is always the lesson about people being blind.

But what I think about is that the fellow quit.
Heck,
if he hadn’t quit,
if he had kept studying,
it would have worked.
It would have taken longer,
but he would have matured,
the art would have matured in him,
and he would have figured it out.
Might have taken him a few decades.
Might not.
He was a smart guy,
after all.

But here’s the thing…
it’s okay to get excited and grab what you can,
just don’t quit after you grab,
and here is the real lesson behind this guy.

For him it was like eating candy.
he grabbed it,
he ate it,
and then there was no more,
so he shrugged and walked away.

i mean,
he tried to eat it,
but he couldn’t,
without what I would have told him,
he just couldn’t ‘digest it,’
so he shrugged and walked away.

He’s still hungry for the ‘candy’ of the martial arts,
doesn’t know it,
but since he gorged himself once,
i know he missed the lesson,
and he’ll do it again,
so I can’t teach him.

Now,
it’s his fault,
but the fellow who taught…
it’s his fault, too.

Big disservice there.

Anyway,
no use crying over spilt milk,
life goes on,
and all I can say is that if you want to learn a system,
be prepared to practice that system for a year or two,
even if it is one of my fast methods,
you have to make sure that you get it,
that you are not just memorizing moves,
but getting the knowledge behind it all.

And,
most important,
if you want the knowledge behind the martial arts,
if you want to know the secrets behind the systems I put together,
if you want to know the concepts that make the real and true martial arts,
check out The Master Instructor Course.
The Master Instructor Course has the real reasons
behind the martial arts.

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/4-master-instructor-course/

You do this course,
and even if you gobbled the martial arts up like candy,
you will understand it all,
and you won’t walk away,
shrugging,
thinking that you got it all.

Okay ka dokely
and remember…

you can lead a horse to water,
but you can’t teach him to fish.
Only the horse can teach himself to fish,
but if horses could wish,
they’d all cast nets.

Got it?

Now have a great and wonderful work out.
Al

A Terrorist, You, and ONE Martial Arts Technique!

What Fight Ender Would You Use Against a Terrorist?

Okay, if you’re a politically correct soccer mom, go away. The girls are pulling your precious Johnny’s pants down and laughing at him.

BUT, if you’re not too delicate of heart, let me ask you a question. Here’s the build up…

martial arts instruction manual

The Ultimate Karate Encyclopedia!

You’re on an elevator. You are staring at your cell phone. There is a picture of a terrorist, and he is the fellow standing next to you!

Your heartbeat escalates, sweat bursts out on your forehead.

He isn’t holding a dead man’s switch, but you know, from the bulge of his belly that he is wearing a vest with explosives!

If you give him a chance, he’ll grab that switch, and that elevator will be on the fast track to hell!

He glances over at you, sees his picture on the cell, and now you know you must move. You know who he is…and he knows you know!

…so there it is. You have time for one, and only one technique. It has got to be a fight ender. You can’t risk him falling down half aware and reaching into his pocket for the dead man’s switch. You have to take him out now!

All the way out!

No second chances!

So what technique are you going to use? Describe it in detail, tell us where it comes from.

It can be from any martial art, or not from a martial art. You can only use weapons that a person might carry on his person and not get busted, and which you, yourself, normally carry.

He can have similar weapons, cause that’s only fair, right?

And, be careful, anything you say will be dissected endlessly, and you just know that some of them cruel Beavis and Butthead types are just waiting to mock you all the way to Bullshido!

So, how are you going to save the world? What technique are you going to use?

Well?

This question posed courtesy of MonsterMartialArts(dot)com!

(Have you checked out The Ultimate Karate Encyclopedia?)

The Problem with Split Timing in Martial Arts

Split Timing Improves Martial Arts Freestyle

When I say split timing in the martial arts I am talking about somebody punching, and you coming in over the punch.

Not reacting, but going through the door at the same time he has, but with better angles.

This is actually the kind of thing that Bruce Lee taught. You can see Anderson Silva doing it in his fights. the other guy punches, and Anderson is not blocking and punching, but rather slipping and punching right over or around the other guys punch.

Classical martial arts trains with block and counter methods, which is not split timing, but a definite tick, tick, tick of the clock. This is reaction timing, or reaction training.

The problem is that reaction, to react, is to when you move because of something else, and it means he did something, he made an action, which caused your action. But that means that you are fighting after the other guy. You are always playing catch up.

And the problem is that this type of training method is prevalent in MMA, or Mixed Martial Arts. You will see fighters in strikeforce or the UFC, and they will punch after the other fellow punches. That puts them a full count behind. they need to split the count,to split the timing,and punch while the door is open.

Let the other guy open the door, but punch at the same time, or right over, but with better angles.

The reason this is so difficult to get is because of the reaction timing built into so many training methods.

But those methods are for beginners.

Advanced is split timing.

Advanced is not reaction, but seeing what is going to happen, and ating before, or at least in concert with.

When the other guy goes to punch, you should already be in motion. You should have seen the lean of the body at the very least, and, if you are an advanced martial artist, then the lean of his mind.

If you do the classical methods long enough you will see the though happen before the action. Once you see it, once you have reached a point of awareness where you see what is going to happen, you have to construct striking methods that take advantage of the window of opportunity.

This is one of the things that is possible through matrixing. Through making the art logical, the person can better reach the point of awareness of seeing what is going to happen before it happens.

He can move out of reaction time and into time ‘inside the moment.’

Not after, but before, or, at least, during.

If you are interested in developing this advanced freestyle ability, if you want to learn how to strike during or before your opponent’s strike, you should look for Martial Arts courses which have ‘lop sau’ in them, such as Matrix Kung Fu or the Shaolin Butterfly.

George Zimmerman Too Fat to Beat Up Trayvon Martin!

Does Mixed Martial Arts Really Work?

In a most interesting testimony at the George Zimmerman trial, George’s Mixed Martial Arts instructor says that his student was physically soft, and didn’t really know how to punch.

This is a fascinating piece of information, and may impact upon the case.

mixed martial arts

His face is skinnier here, but did he know how to punch?

On television George Zimmerman looks chubby, certainly expanded from the pictures of him taken after he allegedly killed Trayvon Martin.

Could somebody overweight and soft taken on somebody young and (presumably) in shape? And do it without even bruising his knuckles?

On the contrary, Trayvon Martin had the bruised knuckles, and George Zimmerman, who had taken Martial Arts for a year, had the bruised face.

This must have been difficult testimony for the Mixed Martial Arts instructor, whose name is Adam Pollock.

He described George as a pleasant fellow who was overweight. Not much muscle or strength. And, after a year, he doesn’t know how to hit somebody.

This makes the instructor look bad. That he could teach somebody for a year and not enable him to defend himself, nor even know how to punch.

Still, whether the Mixed Martial Arts instructor is bona fide or not, whether the MMA is workable or not for real street defense, whether the mixed martial arts instructor was merely defending for a friend and ‘slighting’ the truth, all bypasses the main thing: the black eyes and the broken nose decorating the face of the defendant.

Perhaps it would have been better had George taken some courses from Monster Martial Arts.

Karate Throws That Nobody Knows…

Karate Throws to Warm Your Heart!

Speaking of Karate Throws…
It used to be
people learned Karate
so they could one punch a sucker.
Put him to sleep for a week.
Then,
people couldn’t do it,
and by the time the nineties rolled around
they were ready for Mixed Martial Arts.
Ready to throw and lock,
ground and pound,
smash and trash,
and all that.

shotokan karate throw

Best Karate Throw

Now,
first,
you can one punch somebody if you do it right.
It has to do with depth of punch,
time of actual contact (impact)
and delivering an idea.

But,
this is not about that one punch idea,
this is about throws,
and a lot of people gave up their karate training
because there weren’t any throws in it.

My, my.
Ain’t we silly.

Gichin Funakoshi got together with Jigaro Kano.
Gichin was asking about throws,
Jigaro taught him some.
Then Gichin did a throw
that he had not been taught by Jigaro.
Jigaro was surprised and asked him about it,
and Gichin replied…
‘Oh, we have throws in Karate.’

We have throws in Karate,
what an interesting statement.
Yet the whole world thinks we don’t!
Yet the founder of modern day Karate says we do.
So why don’t we see many throws in Karate?

One reason is because it is easier to teach punches
to huge classes.

Another reason might be
the Japanese had throws,
so why teach them what they already had?

Another reason might be
the Okinawans didn’t want to teach their samurai busting techniques,
to the culture that created the samurai.

Heck,
there could be a lot of reasons.
My personal favorite reason
the Okinawans didn’t teach a lot of throwing techniques in Karate
(they did teach some),
is that the specific physics of Karate
don’t favor the particular mechanics of the body
when doing throws.

The reason I say that
is I learned a few throws,
but they relied on violent karate style motion,
and we didn’t have any ‘judo techniques’ style of motion.

Anyway,
consider all that as you wish,
let’s talk about throws.

In Pinan Three.
The spear hand technique,
you can translate that into an arm wrapping technique,
and take a guy down easy squeezy.

Or,
in Pinan Three,
when you are doing the foot raise
elbow and backfist
on the way back down the center of the form,
you can slide into an opponent,
insert yourself under his arm,
and effectively ‘split’ him.
Bottom half goes one way,
top half goes the other.
And, voila…a throw.

Or,
Pinan Three,
at the end,
when you do the horse stance,
punch over the shoulder.
Perfect for a grab from behind,
you grab his arm,
sideways movement with an arm throw.

Now,
that’s just three off the top,
the truth is,
I could easily find a dozen throws in that form alone.

However,
I don’t bother.
I was interested,
I looked,
I saw,
but I found that it was much better
to matrix the body,
isolate specific lines of energy,
and therefore to isolate the throws and present them as a matrix.

I don’t teach big massive arts,
I don’t teach Karate with all the techniques of all the other arts,
I teach karate as a specific and ordered set of principles,
as a science and not an art,
and then I teach throws
as a specific and ordered art
in Matrix Kung Fu (Monkey boxing).

To try to teach all the arts
through one particular art’s viewpoint
is how we got in the mess in the first place.
Somebody learns a concept,
say it is the clinging energy of Mantis Kung Fu,
then they try to include every single concept
they have ever learned
under the mantle of preying mantis Kung Fu,
and suddenly they are trying to teach the elephant style of Mantis.

And it doesn’t make sense!

All the concepts don’t fit together
if you try to teach them from a single viewpoint!

But,
if you teach each martial art
from the unique viewpoint of that art,
then the arts become small and bite sized.

The problem,
of course,
is that people have never really isolated
the specific concepts of their arts.
Karate is ‘hard,’they say.
But that’s not the unique concept of Karate!
That is a generality,
it points to art,
and not to science!

‘Tai Chi Kung Fu is soft,’ they say.
But all kung fu is not soft,
and so there is misunderstanding,
concepts are mushed together,
and people are left to dig their way through the mess.

Do you understand?

For an art to be considered as a science it must be made logical,
pried apart form other arts,
aligned within itself,
kept separate form other influences.

Then,
when it is understood,
it can be put together with the other arts,
which is to say,
other arts can be taught in similar fashion,
and put together
and made into a whole.

Studied as a mush,
it takes decades to lifetimes
to master the martial arts.
Taken as small, bite sized, and logical matrixes of information,
the whole art can be absorbed quickly and smoothly.
Mastered in a couple of years.

But,
don’t believe me.
Try Matrix Kung Fu,

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/matrix-kung-fu/

See for yourself.
Matrix Kung Fu is virtual all the standing up takedowns in the martial arts.
If there is a takedown not there,
it is invariably able to be figured out
from the throws that are there.

Oinky donkey,
nuff said.
I hope I’ve said enough
to bring you out of the dark ages,
because the golden age of the martial arts
is about to open.

Matrix Martial Arts shows you where the doorknob is,
and all you have to do is turn and enter.
That simple.

Now,
before I go,
Check out The Map.
It’s on the menu of Monster Martial Arts.
I used to have one of these a long time ago,
and I’ve brought it back,
very interesting,
especially if you are on it.

Okay,
remember…

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/matrix-kung-fu/

And I’ll talk to you next Friday.

Al

zen martial arts