Tag Archives: kung fu forms

The Basic Rules of Muscles in the Martial Arts

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The Secret of Strong Muscles in the Martial Arts

And there is a secret.
Before get to it,
let me go over the basic understanding
of how muscles work in the martial arts.

First off,
the forms are calisthenics.
The horse stance is a squat,
the front stance is an almost lunge,
and so on.

And,
every time you snap the muscles,
close them violently to a focus,
you are using plyometrics,
plyometrics is contraction and expansion of muscle
designed to increase strength.

And everybody knows
how studying the leverage of muscles,
and using those muscles,
when throwing people around
is fantastic exercise for the body.

After a lifetime of doing forms,
tossing people around,
striking and kicking,
I am in top shape.
I shake my head in dismay
when I see people younger than me,
tottering around on canes,
clutching walkers,
hauling oxygen bottles.

All that stuff could be avoided.

A little fun in the martial arts every day.

Just playing tag with your fists,
gotcha with kicks,
and a little grab and toss with bodies…

And, it’s not too late!
You can eat right,
exercise right,
and turn your age back.

Anyway,
I promised you a secret.
and it’s good one.
One that I’ve never heard anybody talk about.

At first,
you work out hard.
You build your strength,
you push yourself until you can do those techniques
without any problem.

And,
when it isn’t any problem
you stop working so hard.
In fact,
you start to go backwards.
you use less and less muscles.

The work outs you do won’t be as hard,
but the mental focus is greater,
until you don’t use muscles at all.

Effortless martial arts,
putting somebody down with a finger.
Isn’t that a great ‘death strike?’

Or tossing somebody with a shrug,
everybody stares at you and says,
‘What’d he do?’

And what you do is simple,
you use muscles
until you don’t need muscles.

The fact of the matter is
there are three aspects to the martial arts,
Speed…Power…Technique.

Speed and power diminish with age,
but technique done right,
will never fade.
Good technique uses the muscles less and less,
until you don’t need them.
A weak guy can throw a strong guy.
If a guy was actually to stay weak,
after doing some intense martial arts.
Grin.

But that’s the secret,
do your techniques,
put awareness into your techniques,
until you don’t need muscle,
you just know the angle,
and your correct body alignment
lets the energy flow.

Well,
there’s a lot more to it,
I’ll talk more about this stuff on this blog
at MonsterMartialArts.com

In the meantime,
if you’re interested in some very streetwise stuff
that really works the muscles,
fast changes
lots of good, clean fun,
and exercises that will build muscles
until you reach the stage
where you don’t use muscles,
try this:

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/3a-blinding-steel-matrixing-weapons/

It’s a weapons course,
very logical and quick to do,
and, heck,
the guy who comes after you on the street
will likely have a weapon.
Might just as well learn how to swing a little quick weight at his head,
eh?
Grin.

Happy Easter!

Al

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/3a-blinding-steel-matrixing-weapons/

http://www.amazon.com/Binary-Matrixing-Martial-Arts-Case/dp/1515149501/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1437625109&sr=8-1&keywords=binary+matrixing

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Martial Arts Training Gives a Great and Hard Body!

Martial Arts Training is the Way to Go!

The truth is that Martial Arts Training will put you in the best physical condition you’ll ever be in.

Doesn’t matter if it’s kung fu or karate or taekwondo, or whatever, the fact is that physical conditioning is part of the program.

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I’m 61 in the above vid…and martial arts makes me young and fast!

So, do you want to grow old? Or are you ready to get good!

Now, here’s the key: when you do Karate kata, or Kung Fu forms, or whatever, you are doing physical conditioning. Take a look at the first Kata in Karate: Pinan One. When you do that form you are doing some twenty forward stances. That means you are doing twenty lunges! Furthermore, by doing the lunges on either side, and with the body balanced different ways for different punches and blocks, you are going to get different muscle groups working.

Now, beginners might repeat the form ten times. That’s 200 lunges!

And, when you figure in the different stances, a horse stance is a squat, a kneeling stance is a different type of lunge, and so on, then you end up with an amazingly well rounded and powerful set of legs!

Want to improve the upper body? Hold weights while you do the punches and blocks.

Now, here is the glory that traditional martial arts have, you can do them and do them and do them, and the risk of pulling muscles or otherwise injuring yourself is greatly reduced.

And, IT IS NOT BORING! I can’t tell you how many times I have heard guys complain about the long, boring work out. Well, it’s not boring in a martial arts training center! It’s exciting! Furthermore, in this day and age, you need the self defense training that comes along with this type of conditioning!

I tell you, this type of training will put you in the best shape of your life, and the competitive edge martial arts builds is absolutely cutting edge!

And, here is a great, little bonus! If you don’t feel like going to the gym, you can get yourself some martial arts training videos and really pump up the volume! You can not only work out and get in the best shape of your life, but you can experience all sorts of different martial arts training routines and patterns. Kung Fu, Karate, Aikido, or whatever.

And, here’s something you might like…the best martial arts training videos are available at MonsterMartialArts.com.

zen martial arts

Resistance Training in Kung Fu Forms Makes for More Speed and Power

Best Kung Fu Forms

Resistance training is an interesting concept that has been around for a long time, and especially in the martial arts. There are good sides to it, and bad. In this article I’m going to take this concept apart for better understanding.

The earliest example of resistance training I have seen was in the comic book ads. Charles Atlas, or one of those fellows, claimed that in 15 minutes a day you could build bulging muscles. The bulging muscles, of course, were necessary when you went to beat up that lout who kicked sand in your face and stole your girlfriend.

I remember a couple of the muscle building exercises from those long ago courses. One was to place your hands palm to palm and push one palm across the body, and then reverse the resistance and push the other way. Do it right and you could end up with a sweat, and even improvement on your muscular situation.

The only problem with this approach was more in the advertising than in the resistance exercises themselves. Muscles aren’t necessary to good self defense. In fact, in the extreme an improperly built or trained muscle can actual impede progress and function.

The second and more martial example of resistance training came from a kung fu form I learned. In the form the wrists were placed against one another on the centerline, and tension was built. When the tension reached a peak, you released the pressure and the punch shot out.

This exercise was dynamite, and increased speed and power GREATLY. I used to practice this form a lot, and even developed a few other techniques in which I could use this type of resistance training. In the end, I rubbed all the hairs off my wrists, and my punches got so they could go through anybody’s block.

Let me say one last thing on this subject of building big muscles for the martial arts. Big muscles are fine, but I prefer dense muscles. I prefer muscles that are thick, quick, unassuming, and can do the job ALL day long.

I want my punching muscles to be more like a marathoners legs, than Charles Atlas’s guns…I want muscles that don’t wear out, yet shoot the juice like Clint Eastwood’s big .45.

The martial arts are not about the image of big muscles, they are about how fast you can move. They are not about how good you look, they are about how efficiently you function. So, whether you do resistance training in your kung fu forms is up to you, just make sure that you are improving the speed and power of your punches, and not just trying to look good.

zen martial arts

White Crane Kung Fu Provides The Missing Link In Karate

Did White Crane Kung Fu Became Karate!

White Crane Kung Fu is a powerful and old Chinese Martial Art. It is said to have been developed by a daughter of the Fang family in Fujian province, but this may not be true. Track the lineage back a little further and there seems to be a definite link to Bak Mei.

white crane kung fu

Can you do this?

To understand this old kung fu style, one should probably analyze such karate kata as Sanchin and Hakutsuru. Sanchin kata, in particular, is present in many Karate schools, but the earliest, and least diluted version can be found in Uechi Ryu Karate. Examining the form in that system and one will see the dependence on the hourglass stance and a similarity of hand motion.

The problem with the Japanese versions, in this writer’s opinion, is that the forms are taught either for dynamic tension (body building), breathing, or just technique. If one looks to the earlier versions of the White Crane Forms, one will see the motions rendered more for development of Chi. The moves are softer, yet the stance is harder, and the mind is thus allowed to instill imagination and will into the movements.

Go back even earlier, to the Bak Mei variation of white crane kung fu, and one will see an explosiveness that is designed for intense combat. The fists don’t come back to the body between ‘launches,’ and the entire body lurches into each movement. The result is a quickness and ferocity that outdoes karate variations of the forms.

The history of this kata can be confusing. There are the Okinawan/Japanese versions, and this is connected to China predominately through the art of Kanbun Uechi. He is said to have spent a decade and a half learning three kung fu forms, all of which have resemblance to Chinese White Crane Kung Fu.

In China, the legend is that this unique kung fu was created by a female of the Fang family. She is said to have studied kung fu with her father, and then to have been inspired by the self defense movements of a white crane that fended off a stick she thrust at it. While there does seem to be a connection, it seems more like a teaching legend, and the truth is probably a lineage, rather than an inspiration.

The strongest likelihood is that these forms were passed down from Bak Mei Kung Fu. Bak Mei is practiced in the Fujian (Fukien) province, and the martial art could easily have been studied by the Fang family. This allows for the likelihood of the Karate connection, also.

In summary, if one examines the structure and moves of the form, paying attention to Uechi Karate versions of Sanchin and the Bak Mei versions of Jik Bo, one can see a definite relationship. The author recommends seeking out all versions of the kata, and defining them for focus on dynamic tension, breathing, technique, explosiveness, or whatever you wish to explore. Such forms as Sanchin, Hakutsuru, and the like are very pure in their white crane kung fu history, and could easily be the missing connection to Karate.

Find out more about the creation of such arts as White Crane Kung Fu, and how to make your Kung Fu system the best it can be. Head to Monster Martial Arts.
white crane gung fu