Tag Archives: kenpo karate

Little Girl Uses Dreams to Catch Two Crooks

Newsletter 941
Catching the Crooks

When my grandmother was a little girl
the family was very religious,
went to church every Sunday.

One Sunday her younger sister was sick.
The family decided that just this once
she could stay home.
Sniffling and snuffling,
the young girl went to her room
at the end of the second floor hall
and went to sleep.

Shortly after the rest of the family went to church,
a car pulled up in front of the house.
Two rough looking fellows got out,
looked around,
and hurried up the walk.

In the house they quickly checked for occupants.
One fo the crooks ascended the stairs
and walked down the hallway,
looking in every room.
He stopped right before he reached the young girl’s room.
Heck, there wasn’t anybody home.
He turned around and helped his friend ransack the hosue.

They took jewelry,
silverware,
anything that wasn’t nailed down.
They put the swag in several pillow cases
they had taken out of a closet.
They walked down the front walk
got in their car and drove away.

An hour later the family returned home.
Shocked,
they went through the house,
the mother broke down in tears
and the father called the cops.

The cops came and looked for clues,
and talked to everybody.
But everybody had been at church,
nobody had seen anything.

‘I suppose it’s a good thing nobody was home,’
said the officer.
‘But somebody was home!
Our little girl is sick,
she’s sleeping upstairs.’

The cops asked to speak to the young girl.
The young girl was feeling better,
but she still sniffed and snuffled
when she walked into the room.
And she wasn’t surprised to find out
the house had been burglarized.

‘Oh, yeah,’
she said.
‘I saw them.’

‘But you were sleeping!’
protested her mother.

‘I know,
but I saw them in my dreams.
I watched them take everything.’

One of the cops snorted.
The older one,
the chief,
merely said,
‘Tell me what you saw.’

So my grandmother’s younger sister
told of the crooks driving up,
how they looked around,
how they checked the house for people,
but stopped before they reached her room.
She then described,
step by step,
how the crooks went through the house,
what they took,
how they carried it out the front door.

At the end she said,
‘When they reached their car
one of the men turned around,
saw me looking out of my window,
and he waved to me.
Then he got in the car and they drove away.

The family figured the girl had been hallucinating,
had made up a dream to match what had happened.
The younger cop thought it was a crock.
The older cop asked her to describe the two men.
She did,
and the old cop said,
‘That’s those two boys living on the outskirts of town.’

The cops went off,
broke down the door of the shack the two men were living in
and arrested them.
All of the stolen goods were recovered,
except for a few pieces of silverware
that had already been melted down.

The two crooks confessed,
and their descriptions of their crime
matched everything the younger sister had said,
except for the waving of the hand at the end.
One of the crooks said,
‘I would wave at nobody I had just stole from!’

Now,
this story is absolutely true.
It happened to my grandmother,
who relayed it to my brother and sister and I.
A bit of the Case family lore.

So why do I tell you now?
Because there is something very important you should understand
if you are ever going to learn the truth of matrixing,
and the truth of the martial arts.

There is a sixth sense,
and there are abilities in your dreams,
and they exist,
but they only exist for you
if you believe that they can exist.
Don’t believe and you never get those abilities,
believe and you will find them.

I was raised in a family where we believed in such things,
in the power of imagination and hard work,
where people could have special abilities
if they worked hard enough.

Many of you out there know what I say,
you probably have your own family legends,
your own experiences in imagination and abilities.
But for those of you who are weak in such things,
read this story again,
and realize that this is the stuff of martial arts.

You can learn them fast,
you can have intuition,
you can be superior.
Really,
there is nothing that you can’t do.

You just have to believe.

Have a great work out!
Al

Tai Chi is great for developing intuition and abilities,
here’s the link, and below it a great win!

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/2ba-matrix-tai-chi-chuan/

A WIN!

Al,
Great news! I have been working with the Matrix Tai Chi basics performing each one dozens of times and holding the finished posture for three breaths each. This has made my Five Army form so much better! My power has increased in my karate forms as well. Just need to work on Shaolin Butterfly to get the basics down for the Bagua stuff. Well hope you’re having a great 2016 so far.
Justin

Karate Blocking Transforms Martial Artist

Newsletter 807

How Karate Blocks Make You Better

May you have the best work out of your life.
Really.

black belt techniques

Cover of volume 1 of Kindle version of Matrix Karate ~ click on cover to find out more

Speaking of blocks…
When I was in my teens I was studying Kenpo.
I learned all these neat tricks,
was excited about fighting,
and I kept having these weird ideas about strategy
and how the martial arts were shaped.
Oddly,
I couldn’t make these strategies work.
I could fight well,
but these things I was thinking about,
they just eluded me in combat.
And it was because there wasn’t much
in the way of blocking,
in Kenpo.

In my twenties I joined the Kang Duk Won,
I bashed my arms for years,
and I learned about pain.
I learned that pain is a warning device.
And it was all because of blocks.

Funny.
Most people won’t use a real block in freestyle.
I can,
and do if I am teaching somebody
and there is a lesson in it.
But it’s easier to just hit the other fellow
than it is to block.

But I never would have learned
how to slide in and hit somebody
if I hadn’t learned how to block.

I always remember the specific technique
where it all came home.
It was the technique
from the first move of Batsai.
Batsai is spelled a few different ways,
but it means
‘defending a fortress.’

In that technique I had to do three blocks.
And I had to do these three blocks with hips twists,
I had to twist the hips
to align the body
so it could support the impact
without collapsing.
And I had to do it faster
than somebody could throw three punches at me.

For months I tried to get that technique.
I would practice it and practice it,
get guys to give me that attack,
but I just couldn’t move my body fast enough.

One day,
I did.
Just like that.
One second I couldn’t,
and the next second I could.
Like a switch had been thrown.
But here’s the interesting thing:
I felt like I was behind my head.
I felt like I was out of my body,
just a little bit,
and watching my body move without me.

Well,
it was moving because I had mastered
the thought pattern behind the blocks.
I had practiced that mental circuit
until it broke,
and what was left was me.

From there I moved into other things,
hitting without blocks because,
darn it,
I had gotten so good at them I didn’t need them.
And I moved into concepts
of how to move the energy in my body
just by thinking about it.
Which is understandable if you realize
that learning how to block
had taught me how to influence my body
with just thought.

I began to be able to accomplish
all those odd ideas I had had
way back in Kenpo.
Which led to Matrixing.

Nowadays people don’t practice the blocks.
And if they do,
they don’t practice them with the proper hip movement,
the proper alignment,
the proper breathing and thought.

I know this because when people
come to me for lessons,
they show a complete lack of understanding,
no knowledge of the drills,
of how blocking works.

The thing is
there is a whole realm of thought
that goes with learning how to block.
You learn all sorts of things,
and it builds a springboard
for moving into other concepts.

Think about it,
you can box,
and learn how to take a punch,
but that doesn’t teach you
how to run energy through your body.

Nothing wrong with boxing,
it’s actually pretty good stuff,
fills in a few gaps
that are in the martial arts,
but it just doesn’t have the energy theory
that goes along with the martial arts.

Anyway,
I’m working on the Matrix Karate
for a Kindle version.
Kindle is very unfriendly to photos,
so I have to take some out,
and rewrite the thing.
It’s be good,
but not as good as a book,
or a video.
Heck,
even the other electronic readers are better,
because they take PDFs easily.

But one of the things I focus on
to make up for that lack,
is the specific blocking in the forms.
Not the matrix of blocking,
which provides a logic
which blasts one to intuition,
but the old way,
learning the blocks,
making them work,
until the art does you,
and you become the art.

You guys are lucky.
You understand something the Kindle readers
may never understand.
You get everything on these courses.
On the other hand,
the kindle readers may understand something you don’t
because they will be seeing the art
in a more bare bones viewpoint,
that will let their mind fill in the blanks,
which is very healthy for a student.
Well,
who’s to say.
The real lesson is in the work out.
Getting the material and doing it,
thousands and thousands and thousands of times,
until it becomes you,
and you become it.
That will teach you the art,
no matter which of my books or courses you get.

Here’s the full Matrix Karate course.

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/matrix-karate/

Have a great work out!

Al

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/matrix-karate/

Don’t forget to sign up for the newsletter at
https://alcase.wordpress.com

http://www.amazon.com/Matrixing-Tong-Bei-Internal-Gung/dp/1507869290/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1423678613&sr=8-1&keywords=tong+bei

How the Kenpo Belt Rank System changed the Martial Arts

The Kenpo Belt Rank System

The Kenpo Belt Rank System is an interesting, little work. It is divided into a colored ranking system that goes like this: white, orange, purple, blue, green, brown (3 ranks), and Black Belt (multiple ranks).

kenpo karate system training manual

150 Kenpo techniques scientifically analyzed.

There is a problem with this, which I will describe in a second, but first, let me tell how the belt system came about.

Originally there were fewer colors. Some hold only a white belt and black belt, but most belt systems, at least inKarate, had four colors. white, Green, Brown, and Black Belt.

Students of Ed Parker, the Tracy Brothers came a cross a dance instructor from Fred Murray Dance Studios, and he showed the brothers how to put students on contracts. This was a boon to the hard working karate instructor, for it enabled him to hold people to contracts, and therefore paying dues longer.

The problem was that there were so many techniques to be dispersed through the belts. Thus, the kenpo karate techniques were divided into 8 groups, which turned out to be about 40 techniques per belt.

Students were taught a technique every lesson, thus keeping them on a belt level for 20 weeks. 8 times 20 and you have 160 weeks, divided by 50 weeks in a year, and you have three polls years to get to black belt. And, it actually took about four years.

A complete system of Kenpo, including 150 techniques, made to work.

A complete system of Kenpo, including 150 techniques, made to work.

The problem was that before that people earned their black belts in a fraction of the time. Mike stone, arguably the best karate tournament fighter in the world, got his black belt in 7 months.

Now, if somebody like Mike Stone came along, he couldn’t earn his black belt fast, but was stuck in the time scheme of four years.

In other words, he could only go as fast as the contract allowed. The odd thing was that people loved it. Although, to be honest, this writer thinks they loved it because of the intimacy and efficiency of the private lesson.

Anyway, one can argue about this, dispute it if they wish, and so what. People either buy into it or not, and that is up to the person.

As for myself, I was to test for brown belt, and I got drafted, and then, when free again, I joined a different school.

The belt ranking system in this school was 8 belts, but there were only four colors: white, green, brown, and black belt. Each color had a level or two in it.

lop sau rolling fists freestyle drill

Making Kenpo Karate unique to every individual.

And, the odd thing, we weren’t on contract, and people could go as fast as they learned the material. This made us work harder, for we could see the end of the race, and didn’t feel we had to go around the track three or four extra times.

So we had people who earned a black belt in a couple of years, and sometimes less.

Oddly, time was increasing to black belt, but that was because karate, and then Kung Fu (courtesy of Bruce Lee) was popular, new systems were being discovered, and more forms and techniques were being added to the system.

So I made it through, just in time, I might add.

And that is the story, plus a couple of extras thrown in, about how the Kenpo Belt system came to be.

If you want to break out of the forced time to black belt, it is recommended that you start studying on your own, outside of school, and accumulate sufficient information so that you know what works, especially in Kenpo, and have a large database of martial arts knowledge.

Check out the ‘Creating Kenpo Karate’ series by Al Case. It has 150 techniques completely and scientifically analyzed, plus a wealth of data concerning how to make any martial art system efficient and workable.

This has been an article about the Kenpo Belt Rank System.

Martial Arts Laws that Make You Blink!

Newsletter 738
Martial Arts Laws that Make You Slap Your Head and go ‘Doh!’

Okay,
here’s the headlines:
In Republic, Michigan…
Women over 200 pounds
and wearing shorts,
may not practice the martial arts
while men are present!

kenpo karate system training manual

How to analyze and handle Kenpo Karate

I’m not kidding. I saw it on the net,
so it must be true.
And if you’re a gal
over 200 pounds
don’t complain to me,
complain to the town council
at Republic, Michigan.
Or just don’t workout around men.

Ready for another headline?
In Jefferson, Idaho…
Women can’t take Karate lessons in a bathing suit
unless they are accompanied by the police
or have a club!
This law doesn’t apply
if the lady is under 90 pounds or over 200 pounds,
and it certainly doesn’t apply to female horses.
Oh, I ain’t kiddin’!

And I hope you don’t think I’m sexist,
here’s a headline about drunks!
(Does that make me a drunkist?)
In Cotton, Minnesota…
You may not work out in cotton pants with hip pockets!
Well, of course.
Hip pockets are just a little too convenient
for carrying a pint of alcohol.
And who among us,
during the sweat and bruises of a good work out,
doesn’t need to stop and swill a bit of courage?
Eh?

I read these headlines on the net,
can’t guarantee the veracity of them,
or even whether they are true,
but they sure do make you think.
I mean,
thank God for politicians.
It’s obvious they have our best interests at heart,
and they sure are making us safe
by passing laws like these.

And, speaking of thinking,
I was talking to Master Instructor Kurt Nelle’,
we were talking about the Kenpo Karate series,
and I asked him to give me a quick report.
Here it is…

Al, I just finished reading the 1st Kenpo Karate book and as requested I am doing a little book report.  I found the History both fascinating and refreshing. I have found that Kenpo history given by the various main stream Kenpo schools,(Parker, Tracy etc), tend to flatter them selves. I appreciate an honest history from someone who was there closer to the start of Kenpo in America.

Next I move on to main text of the book. My Kenpo instructor did come out of the Parker School however, he did not teach the Parker Forms or any forms for that matter. He only taught the self defense and fighting techniques as well as Kenpo Concepts just as you do in this book. You however, have taken it a step further. My Instructor taught the techniques exactly as they were found in the forms. You clean them up and make them more practical. I really appreciated this as I like a 1,2,3 technique as opposed to traditional Kenpo Overkill concept.

While reading over the Techniques and animation in the first book, something clicked in my memory. I went and reviewed the “Lines” section of the Matrix Tai Chi Program. Your explanation of the Karate Basics being found in Tai Chi led me to review the Matrix and  Five Army forms, as well as the Chang Man Ching, Yang and Chang Tung Shun Tai Chi forms that I also practice and teach. There within the sequences of all those forms were found the Kenpo applications. Not the traditional Overkill applications but the streamlined applications as presented in your Kenpo book. I don’t know if this was intended on your part or rather a happy coincidence. Either way, I have decided to use Tai Chi Forms as the only forms in my Kenpo. Its all in there, I just needed something to connect all the dots and that something is your three book series on Kenpo Karate!

Well that’s my book report. I’m moving on to the second and third books now, thank you for writing them!

Respectfully, Kurt

Thank you Kurt.

And if anybody else has a book report,
on any of my books,
feel free to send it in.
I can use what you write
to help people understand what is in my books,
and I’ll send you a freebie of
‘The 500 Martial Arts Articles’
in exchange.
It’s in PDF,
so you can read them right on your computer.

Now,
last things last,
my thanks to Omar,
he wrote in and complained,
said he wasn’t getting my newsletters.

I realized,
after I chatted with him,
that he might have been saying
that I am just not writing my newsletters
often enough.
I usually try to write two a week,
but I have probably been slacking.
I’ll try to get back to that,
and if I don’t,
feel free to complain.

You know
complaints are funny things.
Most people don’t want them.
I want them…fast.
They tell me when I messed up,
they apprise me of my mistakes,
and allow me to fix mistakes
before they become serious misunderstandings.
Business or personal.
And you know what the Neutronic viewpoint
of mistakes is…
Mistakes are an opportunity to learn.
So show me my mistakes,
and I’ll be grateful.

Now,
think that’s about it.
Got any questions,
or contentions,
shoot me an email,
it inspires me on the newsletters
and other things I write.

Check out the Kenpo books,
there are three of them,
and the first is here…

http://www.amazon.com/How-Create-Kenpo-Karate-History/dp/1500930253/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1413151594&sr=8-3&keywords=how+to+create+kenpo

Have yourself a great work out!

Al

http://www.amazon.com/Matrixing-Tong-Bei-Internal-Gung/dp/1507869290/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1423678613&sr=8-1&keywords=tong+bei

The Messed Up History of Kenpo Karate

Kenpo History Sort of a Mess

Kenpo Karate is one of the most popular martial arts in the world, and the history is, to put it lightly, a mess.

There are three men who brought Kenpo to the streets of America. These are James Mitose, William ‘Thunderbolt Chow, and Ed Parker.

kenpo karate training manual

What really happened with Mitose, Chow and Parker.

James Mitose learned the art at a temple in Japan. Except, there is no temple there. The area is the home of kosho sect of the Yoshida clan, so maybe. Except…when you think about it, would there be much significance if your instructor learned Karate at a Baptist church somewhere in Illinois?

Yes, there are differences in culture, and there is a potential zen aspect to it all, but churches are basically meeting places.

The second man in this lineage is William ‘Thunderbolt’ Chow. Professor Chow claimed that he originally learned martial arts from his father, a Buddhist priest. Except, there are no records of his father as a priest. And how does that tie in with the Kenpo he learned from James Mitose?

The third man in this saga is Edmund Parker.

Parker brought Karate to the mainland, began teaching martial arts while at Brigham Young University. Except, he is said to have taught his students all he knew – he was only a brown belt – and when he went home and tried to get more to teach…Professor Chow wouldn’t teach him anything because he had been instructing without permission!

Now, there are a lot more sordid details to this story. There are fights and arguments and people slandering one another, and the reader might think, at this point, the this writer is writing black headlines just to sell an article. Except…the real problem here is not the three men, it is the students learning their kenpo karate martial art.

bruce lee kenpo training

How to shift your forms for maximum potentials

People seem to need to bolster themselves up, to give themselves airs, to make themselves sound more important than they are.

So when Mitose says, in an offhanded remark, ‘Yes, my father used to show me tricks when I was a kid. We were living next to a church then, and we would roll around on the grass in the side yard. Lot of fun…’ the student bows deep and realizes that his instructor studied at a zen temple, was beaten with a bamboo rod for dozing, and had to go through rigamarole that would make Gordon Liu envious.

And when Thunderbolt Chow says, ‘Yes, my father had dreams of being a priest, talked about it often. Priests know really great martial arts, you know,’ the student holds his finger aloft as the lightening strikes him, and knows that he studying ancient and arcane mysteries written down in scrolls dating back to the time of Buddha.

And when Parker says, ‘My instructor didn’t have any more to teach me,’ the student catches his breath and claps his hands together, for obviously his instructor has surpassed his instructor, and the student is the real beneficiary of all this light and goodness.

lop sau rolling fists freestyle drill

the last third of 150 Kenpo techniques scientifically analyzed

Yes, there are people who spread rumor and prevarication to make themselves look good, but it is up to the student to be discerning and find out the real truth…and, there is a lesson to be learned here.

The lesson is that man learns best from his mistakes. He learns a little bit from doing something well, but he learns A LOT from messing up. And these three men, James Mitose, William ‘Thunderbolt’ Chow, and Ed Parker, they were human, and they messed up.

So, are we going to make them saints and pretend they made no mistakes? Or are we going to look extra hard at their mistakes and learn, truly learn, from them?

The author began studying Kenpo Karate in 1967. Check out the three volume set analyzing Kenpo Karate (see illustrations above for links). History, forms, and 150 techniques broken down and scientifically analyzed. This will forever change the way you look at and do Kenpo Karate.

How to Make Kenpo Karate Perfect

Are there Too Many Kenpo Techniques?

I wrote the following comment on a forum where I had posed a question concerning Kenpo having too many techniques. Thought it deserved a reprint here, because it goes to the heart of Matrixing. You can find the original article here…

https://alcase.wordpress.com/2014/11/22/ed-parker-finally-speaks-on-too-many-kenpo-techniques-2/

kenpo karate training manual

150 Kenpo Techniques matrixed

I wrote a dictionary of Martial Arts. You can find it somewhere on the net if you google ’Matrixing Technical dictionary.’

The thing that actually got me started on this thing of too many techniques for Kenpo is this simple fact: When you line up the techniques in your system they are taught a) out of order, and b) they’re are missing techniques. This has turned out to be an absolute, and this is why it takes people so many years to maser the martial arts. The first time I wrote out a list of techniques, in order and no missing pieces, the result on the students were astounding. It wasn’t even a combat sequence, it was just stand up grab arts, and there were only forty of them, but suddenly the guys were free styling like they had years of experience. The learning curve went out the roof, so I started doing it to everything, and the same results were evident in every art I had. The conclusion was this: if the art is in order, with no missing pieces, the learning curve can be up to ten times faster. The lack was in polish, but if the student stuck with it, the polish happened within a couple of months. So even that was transformed. Anyway, I started the martial arts back in 1967. and in that time I have never seen an art with all the pieces and in the right order. It just doesn’t happen. But if they did, I speak from personal experience, the result is an art that functions on a conceptual level, and is much faster and easier to learn.

Have a great work out!

Al from monstermartialarts.com

BTW ~ the special two courses for the price of one will be over on the first of January. Go to MonsterMartialArts.com, pick out any course, order it, then pick out another course of equal value, and email me (aganzul@gmail.com) and let me know. You’ll get that second course for free!

MonsterMartialArts.com came into existence in 2002. The first Matrix course (Matrix Karate) was introduced in 2007.

Kenpo Karate Board Breaking with the Head…Yikes!

How One Man Almost Broke His Head with a Board in Kenpo Karate

I was studying Kenpo Karate back in 1967. I lived for Kumite (karate freestyle), and I thought that breaking was a subsection of martial arts reserved for the truly great.

I was excited, then, when I heard that a special board breaking seminar was going to be put on at my school.

survivalist martial art

Marine Corps Martial Arts Program from the Classical Point of View

On the appointed day we lined up and bowed in. There were about twenty of us, and we stared at the huge pile of boards that were waiting for our hardened fists and excited souls.

The head instructor, a slight fellow name of Rod, came to the head of the class and began telling us the things we needed to know. We learned the theory of how to tighten the fist, how to strike through the board, and how to have total and utter confidence!

One of the fellows, Jeff, raised his hand.

“Sir? Rod? Can you break a board with your head?”

Rod smiled, “Yes, but you need to practice hard, make sure you understand all the things you need to before you try such a thing.”

Shortly afterwards we adjourned to another room to continue the seminar.

Jeff, however, was not with us.

Rod was going over how you have to hold the board, how you have to protect your fingers and brace the arms, when, suddenly, there was a sharp and loud THONK! from the other room.

Nobody said anything, we just held our breath and waited, and, suddenly, Jeff appeared at the doorway.

He was standing slanted. He walked off kilter across the room and knelt at the end of the line. Even his zazen was off kilter.

He was giving his total attention to Rod, however, so the seminar went on.

We broke a lot of boards that day, made a lot of kindling for winter, and at the end, everybody bowing to Rod and talking excitedly, Jeff made his way to the front of the class.

“Sir? Rod? Can you break a board with your head?”

He had no idea that he had ever asked that question before.

Are you a Kenpo martial artist? Check out The Man Who Killed Kenpo.