Tag Archives: fight

Why Karate (and the whole martial arts) Works!

Newsletter 630
The Exact Reason Karate (and the Martial Arts) work

Great day to you!

I’m going to get into the good news,
why the martial arts work, in just a second, but first, the bad news.

Computer crash. A bad one.
Wiped out a LOT of stuff.
So if I ask for your address, or can’t remember what you ordered,
that’s why.
Forgive me, but I just lost my second brain.

Well, after we’re all done crying (grin),
let’s get on with the good news.

Every problem you have,
every last single one,
is based on one single neutronic datum.

Somebody came towards you,
and they reached you,
and you bought it.

So the teacher says,
you‘ll never amount to much.
So you don’t.
She got to you.

Just like a dog bites you
and you have a scar,
when somebody says something bad to you,
tells you you’re a knothead,
or worthless,
or just shut up,
if you buy it,
you get smaller.

Hey,
pound on something with a hammer,
and it shrinks.

Before long you don’t want to fight back,
you don‘t want to stand up for yourself,
you just want to be let alone,
and life sucks.

Now,
the martial arts work for the simple reason
that you learn to fight back,
to stand up for yourself.

And,
you reach a point where somebody says something,
and you stand there and grin,
and their nasty remark travels on past.
You cease being a target.
No matter how vicious,
you just laugh it off.

You realize that it is their problem,
not yours.

It is a sick personality that goes around saying nasty things to people,
and doing nasty things to people.

The good news is that when you reach the point
where people miss you with their viciousness,
their nasty remark
boomerangs and hits them.

You just sit there,
they want to hammer you a bit,
but you laugh,
and somebody comes out of the blue
and punches them in the nose.

It’s actually funny to see this happen.

First time I ever saw it happen I was in the army.
This guy didn’t like me,
and he started saying things,
and I ignored him.
Then he started challenging me to a fight,
and I just grinned.
Then,
I took a shower,
came back and sat on my bunk,
and he comes up and stands in front of me,
looks down.
I’m dripping wet in a towel,
his fists knot up,
and he says,
‘I’m gonna knock the crap out of you!’
I said,
‘Nope.’
And I was so confident, so smiling,
and he started yelling at me,
trying to provoke me,
and suddenly this guy from across the aisle comes up to us and says,
‘He doesn’t want to fight! Leave him alone!’
The guy who wanted to fight told him to mind his own business,
and the next thing you know,
they were rolling on the floor,
punching and kicking and having a grand fight.
Guys were laughing,
betting money,
and I…I went to the movies.
That’s right.
I got dressed and went to the movies.

Hey, it had nothing to do with me, right?

Now,
the deeper level.
Things come towards you, or go away from you, or in the same direction.
You just figure out the motion.

In the martial arts you look at the fist coming towards you,
you analyze it,
and decide what direction you want to take.
Away, towards, or with.
Those are the only three possible answers.

But,
more important…
your awareness builds.
And, the smaller dojo of the martial arts,
teaches you about the larger dojo of life.

Somebody gets mad at you,
he’s all emotional,
but you’re past that,
you simply look at him
wait for emotion to become motion,
and then make your choice.

No motion,
all emotion,
who cares,
you’re too busy looking at him
to get fooled into offering motion back for emotion.

Do you see how simple it is?

And now you know why people who don’t do the martial arts
have such a rough time in life,
and why people who do study the martial arts
have such an easy time in life.

They have grown awareness of the way the universe works,
they have made decisions,
trained themselves to make decisions,
until they can handle the universe.

Personally,
nothing makes me happier than when somebody gets in my face,
wants to get physical,
threatens me.

Something is happening!
So I get to have some fun!
I watch,
I analyze,
I wait for emotion to become motion,
or not.

And I have a big grin on my face because
this is exactly what I’ve trained myself to do.

Okay,
here’s the bad news.

Normal martial arts takes twenty to thirty years to get to the place I’ve just described.
So,
do you want to take 20 or 30 years to get there?

There’s a lot of punches to the face that can arrive in 20-30 years.

Heck, people drop out for all sorts of reasons.
They learn to fight,
but not to handle life.
So they end up with problems happening to them.
And they can’t handle them because
they haven’t gotten all the way through the martial arts.

So you matrix.

What people don’t realize is that matrixing is a form of logic.
It is actually a scientific graph that comes from a form of algebra.

Yes,
there is a complete system of Karate that I use to teach Matrixing.
there are complete systems of martial arts on just about every course I offer.
But it is the matrixing that is important,
because when you learn to think logically
you can learn things ten times faster.

Not just the martial arts,
but anything.

You just learn to analyze the motion of ANY field,
to place the motion in the proper place,
and learn how to handle that subject.

And the really, really sad news…
most people get a scrap of matrixing,
and they say,
‘oh, we have that in our system.’

But they don’t.
Matrixing has NEVER been done on this planet before.

It’s been hinted at,
there’s pieces that look like matrixing,
but…no.
It’s a new subject.

So these people who are learning fantastic martial arts,
and are trying to organize everything,
are grabbing at straws.
They will study for a few years and drop out,
or,
at best,
they will study for a lifetime,
and not really get it.

They will talk about the need to beat people up to win a fight.
Or they will talk about how people need respect.
Grrr.
And they will not be capable of seeing a fight develop,
and be able to stop it
just by laughing.

True.

Oinkey dokely.
Here’s the URL…

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/matrix-karate/

And you guys and gals have a GREAT workout!

Al

Keep Your Wits About You in a Fight

Have Choice During a Fight

It’s the week end!

Call a bunch of friends,

head for a spot in the woods,

and…

work out!

Hey,

let me share a little freestyle with you.

There’s a few things I do,

that I don’t think I’ve talked about,

not on any course,

so let me share one of my freestyle methods with you.

Before we start,

let me say that when I teach somebody how to fight,

the first thing I do

is teach him how not to flinch.

Flinching is when the fellow cringes.

Basically,

he shrinks in spot,

and this immobilizes him,

makes him a better target,

and this even tends to

shut down his awareness.

Simply,

he thinks he’s going to get hit,

and becomes the deer in the headlights.

So I do the following exercise

so that he will not flinch or cringe,

so that he will remain aware,

and so that he comes to a quick understanding

that he has choice in freestyle.

Please remember that I don’t go too fast,

nor strike too hard.

I am interested in teaching,

not beating.

I tell Joe Beginner to stand in front of me.

I take a split bamboo sword,

preferably a small one,

but a big one will work.

I make an x pattern in the air

and I tell him that the strike is going to come

diagonally to his head.

I strike down at his head,

45 degrees,

and tell him to do a high block.

I alternate the strikes to his head,

right and left,

until he has the choice down.

Once he has the choice down,

I won’t necessarily alternate.

Right…left…left…left…right…left…right…right,

jogging the pattern until he can handle the block

no matter what side.

I don’t play with the timing much,

at least not yet.

I am not trying to fool him.

I am trying to teach him.

And,

again,

I do everything slowly.

I don’t want him to make any mistakes,

until I deem it necessary for him to make mistakes,

in other words,

when he has the block down,

then I can push him a little,

show him his mistake,

back off while he learns,

then speed up again,

until he makes a mistake,

back off while he learns,

speed up until he makes a mistake,

and so on.

Okay,

Joe Blow can now do a high block to the right or the left,

and it has only been a couple of minutes.

So I strike diagonally up towards his  ribs,

and I tell him to do low blocks.

I do the same training procedure for the low block

as I did for the high block.

A couple of minutes and he has the low block and the hi block down.

No prob.

So I now give him both head strikes and rib strikes,

I mix up the strikes,

and I make him choose between

right high block

left high block

right low block

left low block.

Remember,

I am going slow.

Letting him get the blocks,

pushing a little,

backing off,

and he only makes a mistake maybe every eight or ten strikes.

His mind is getting faster,

and he is already comfortable with the blocks.

The lesson has been going maybe ten minutes.

Time to do a change on him.

and before I get into this change,

I call this drill that I am telling you…

‘block and dodge.’

He has learned to block,

time to make him learn to dodge.

I take the split bamboo stick

and strike to his head.

I strike laterally,

from the side

and I tell  him to duck.

And,

it isn’t unusual that I clock him,

and he grins and rubs his head

because he’s getting into the game.

And,

he ducks effectively,

so I swing the stick along the ground

towards his feet,

and I tell him to jump.

Now he has to figure out whether to jump or duck,

and I mix up the pattern.

Duck…duck…jump…duck…jump…jump…jump…

and so on.

Then I tell him to step to the side,

and I swing the stick directly down upon his head.

He probably gets his shoulder bonked the first time,

but he gets it the second time.

I tell him he can only stand in one of two spots,

and that when I strike down on him

he must choose between the two,

not dance around from spot to spot

and make me chase him.

Okay,

within a minute

he can duck, jump, or step to the side.

I mix it up,

he is hard to hit,

and I make sure I barely push him,

only a mistake every eight or ten times.

If I make him make a mistake every time,

he doesn’t learn.

eight or ten is about right,

makes him feel good about himself,

but reminds him to be aware

and not let his awareness down.

He has to watch me constantly,

and never let himself

slide back into that unaware state

where he is just a deer in the headlights.

That is his unaware state,

the one the martial arts are going to cure him of.

Now,

he has got two exercises.

He can block with the high and low block,

and he can dodge with a duck, jump, or sidestep.

So we put them together.

He must not do both a block and dodge,

he must choose between the two,

and he must figure out

whether my strike is coming towards the head or ribs…

and block,

or whether I am going for the feet or the head or straight down…

and dodge.

And,

I go slow,

let him get used to the patterns,

and I gently push him into quicker and quicker decisions.

Now,

the lesson has only taken twenty minutes,

at the most,

but I have a student who doesn’t cringe or flinch,

and who can make decisions

right in the middle of the action.

I have increased his awareness

with no real bruises,

and a fair amount of sweat.

He can block or dodge at choice,

and he is MUCH more aware

than when the drill started.

And,

if you want to know my freestyle methods

past this quick introduction,

why…

grin…

I include freestyle methods on most of the courses.

I only do block and dodge a few times,

however,

then I move him into ever more realistic fighting,

but always trying to make him aware.

Now,

I know you fellows

probably have your own methods,

but maybe you can use this one,

or make up a variant

to go along with your own system.

But,

if you want an incredibly simple exercise,

that teaches one how to do advanced freestyle

in literally minutes,

check out the Rolling Fists course.

It’s here…

http://www.monstermartialarts.com/Learn_How_to_Fight.html

It boils everything down to six moves,

really fast freestyle

that can handle any type of attack,

no matter how frantic and unexpected.

Then,

when you get the Rolling fists exercise down,

get the Matrix Kung Fu course

and adding the forty techniques,

one at a time,

to the drill.

It gets weird,

you start to see ALL sorts of variations and possibilities.

Do I add the technique here or here,

Oh! good Lard, that certainly opened some doors!

Guaranteed,

your freestyle abilities

are going to go out the roof

when you add the Rolling Fists drill,

and especially when you add the forty techniques

of Matrix Kung Fu to it.

You are going to become MUCH more aware

and in just a few minutes.

Now remember,

diagonally down on the head for the high blocks,

diagonally up on the ribs for the low blocks

sideways to the head for ducking

sideways to the feet for jumping

straight down on the head for stepping to the side.

Five simple steps,

done gently to a mix and match,

and there you go,

an aware student

who wants more.

Not a beat up student

who is excited

and then drops out

because he is overwhelmed.

And the Rolling Fists,

for people who have freestyle experience,

is exactly that simple.

Talk to you later,

have a great week end,

and a great work out!

Al

zen martial arts

Fight or Flight…Your Choice

Asleep, Dreaming That You Are Awake.

Fight or flight is an interesting choice. For most people, however, it is not a choice, but something they do blindly, no choice at all.

learn how to fight

Wake up!

If a dog snaps at you, there is intuitive movement. The movement is always away. Teeth win, hand lose, no contest, get the heck outa Dodge.

If a human being snaps at you…hmm. Most people jump back, enter into flight mode. The problem is that it is a blind reaction. And, unfortunately, the few people who leap at the snapper…it is a blind reaction for them, too. Just a slightly different blindness.

So what if your back was to a cliff, and a human snapped at you. Would you jump off the cliff? I mean, when do you start making choices? In this scenario your choice comes about because the fall off a cliff would hurt more than a snapping human. Surprisingly, most people would jump off a cliff.

When you study martial arts you change that. At first, you get a little hair trigger. Somebody growls at you, and you growl back before you even think about what you are doing. And if they snap at you, they end up with a fist in their eye.

But what if it is granny that tapped you on the back late at night? In that scenario you just knocked granny’s false teeth out, armlocked her to the ground and stepped on her spindly, little neck. Grandpa ain’t gonna be too happy about that.

So you have to get past flight AND fight as blind responses. You must train until you move from choice, and not from reaction.

When you do this, when you gain choice in your actions, no matter what the threat or how severe, you have increased your awareness. Or, to put it another way, you have woken up.

Man, you see, is asleep…dreaming that he is awake. It’s true.

That guy filling out the voting form? He’s as blind as the guy pulling the silver arm in a casino. Throw away money or throw away future…or throw away a whole country…it is a form of unconsciousness.

You, reading this. You are only dreaming that you are reading this. You’re actually asleep, and you will finish this bit of eye exercise and continue to be asleep.

So, want to wake up? Do the martial arts.  Learn Karate or Tai Chi or something. Become aware of all your potentials and choices. Stop dreaming that you’re awake and…AWAKE!fight or flight