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Shaolin Kung Fu, a Faster Way to an Old Martial Art

Shaolin Kung Fu Can Be Learned Online!

Shaolin Kung Fu, the popular myth states, takes lifetimes to learn. You have to go spend three days sitting in front of the temple to be accepted for teaching. You have to undergo bizarre training rituals that will enable you to do handstands on one finger, rip the bark off of trees, break tones of concrete with your head, and…and that’s not the truth.

Those are myths spread by people who want to impress people; by TV programming like the Kung Fu series starring David Carradine.

shaolin kung fu

You don’t have to go to the Shaolin Temple to learn Kung Fu…you can learn this ancient martial art online!

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// The truth is actually quite a it more simple, yet even more powerful.

The first Shaolin Kung Fu book to hit the shores was ‘Secrets of Shaolin Temple Boxing’ by Robert W. Smith.

In that book Mr. Smith stated that Bodhidharma brought Kung Fu to the Shaolin Temple. Actually, he brought a system of calisthenics to help the dilapidated monks get strong enough to listen to his lectures without falling asleep.

The monks used this method to get stronger, and ended up defending themselves against bandits, and changed the simple calisthenic into a self defense system.

The monks realized five principles of combat (animal fighting modes), eventually expanding the five principles into 72 techniques.

So Shaolin Kung Fu shouldn’t take a lifetime to learn. It should be able to be learned within a few months.

The original Shaolin monks learned it within months; why can’t you?

The reason is that for over 2,000 years well meaning people have been adding things to the once simple system. These things have confused Shaolin Kung Fu, mushed concepts all together, put techniques out of order, and even slanted it for tournaments or other personal interest.

In Shaolin Kung Fu the five animal fighting modes have been redefined. The original five animals were the tiger, snake, crane, leopard, and dragon.

But the tiger and the leopard are similar; why should you learn two animals that ae pretty much the same?

In the system called the Shaolin Butterfly the five animals are the tiger, snake, crane, dragon, and Monkey.

Actually, the monkey has been held to be one of the original five animals by many schools of thought.

So, we have a revised and better definition of the five animal fighting modes.

Now, each of the five animals has a specific attribute; one gives strength, one gives balance, and so on.

The problem is that these attributes are mere descriptions, tactics, at best, and not real martial arts techniques.

However, if you assign a stance to each animal, you suddenly come up with the five original concepts of the Shaolin Kung Fu monks.

The tiger is aggressive, and he uses the front stance for charging.

The crane is delicate and balanced, and he uses the one legged, crane stance to achieve this.

The Dragon twines and writhes, and he uses a cross kneeling type of stance.

The snake is flexible clinging, and he uses such stances as the one legged squatting stance.

The monkey is agile, and he uses the back stance to build this agility.

Now, these are still mere approximations of techniques. But one can see how the five stances could be used to begin the animal emulation process. But, how does one expand upon these stances/characteristics into a simple list of techniques?

Well, there is only so much that can be put into an article.

But, if you really want to learn this stuff, and I mean in months instead of lifetimes ~ if you want to figure this stuff out and be able to use it in real life ~ then you’ll find another great article on Shaolin Instruction at Monster Martial arts. Or, you can take a look at the Shaolin Kung Fu Butterfly course itself.

On Shaolin Butterfly Kung Fu!

On the Shaolin Butterfly!

Let me start this article on the Shaolin Butterfly Kung Fu
by telling you that
my introduction to energy was through
the classical karate forms.
Zowie,
and I recommend to all.
However,
I know that not everybody is a karate enthusiast.
Karate has been pretty corrupted,
there is more mystique to Kung Fu,
and I was actually thinking about this
when I put together the Shaolin Butterfly.
The Shaolin martial art I used
to develop the Butterfly
was Fut Ga.
Fut Ga is hard core Shaolin,
similar to Hung Gar and Choy Lee Fut,
and that style of art.
karate ki power

What Can You Really Do with Martial Arts Chi Power?

I had learned a lot of forms,

spent some intense time going over them,
looking for applications,
and that sort of thing.
But,
I didn’t get the same type of power from Fut Ga
that I got from Karate.
I got power,
but it was more healthy power,
not explosive power.
So I ransacked Fut Ga,
found the basic footwork pattern I wanted to matrix,
and set about arranging the concepts I learned
in a more powerful and cohesive fashion.
The end result of this,
the benefit of Shaolin butterfly,
is that the power comes faster and harder,
yet the healthy body aspect remains.
Also,
I could condense the concepts
and make them easier to learn.
Also,
I could adapt it to freestyle better.
I was a little shocked at how Fut Ga
did not approach freestyle
in a more concentrated fashion.
I guess I watched
a little too much David Carradine.
Grin.
Anyway,
I have had absolutely tremendous wins
from people who have done the Shaolin Butterfly.
One of my first big wins
was from a fellow who was
totally discouraged with the martial arts,
and the Shaolin Butterfly ‘revived’ him.
He bought the original book,
and it changed his life.
Made me very glad.
So I have a win for you.
Actually,
it is more of an analysis of the Butterfly.
Here it is.
Al,
Thought I would give some feedback on the course:
1.  Liked how each move in the form is demonstrated.
2.  Like how each move is progressed into a take-down.  It seems you are very interested in that.
3.  Like the variety of concepts involved here.
4.  Don’t understand why neither you or your assistant never have your hands up.  It’s so basic.  Seeing your assistant’s arm just droop like that is hard to look at.
5.  Having hands up would affect timing and the ability to commit on some strikes and take-downs. So I have to be selective.  However, I viewed dvds from respected lineage instructors and felt the same way.
6.  Like how forms have a focus and each form is a different focus.
7.  Like the concept of forms being launch points.
8.  Like the variety of moves.  Found the dragon form most interesting.
9.  The book adds very little to the dvds.  I thought this would cover a more theoretical discussion.
This is part of a project to survey some different martial arts and see what I can take from each and use what I’m happy with.  My hopes is that this can replace some of the workout time spent in the gym, but be grounded in reality at the same time.   I value your course because it covers a lot for $30.   I’ll probably order a few more courses as a part of my study.
Jim
Thanks Jim,
I appreciate your analysis.
And,
Jim had a lot of good stuff to say,
and a few points which he considered weaknesses.
Now,
the book was written first,
the DVDs were done later,
just to illustrate the book,
show how to translate the art into freestyle,
and so on.
And,
the hands down.
Tell the truth,
I have thought about the hands down thing
much over the years.
I remember my instructor doing it,
and I watch people on the tube and various other places
when they do it.
Jim is right,
it is a weakness,
but,
it is something some people do
when they are done.
Technique done,
all done,
no need for the arms to be up.
Lower arms.
Interesting.
So,
no excuse,
remember his point when you do the course.
And make sure you send me your wins,
or your analysis,
or whatever.
Maybe I can share,
and what somebody says
might be what somebody else needs.
Anyway,
here is the URL
Check it out
and I’ll talk to you later.
 Al
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