Category Archives: shorin ryu

How I Got the Ultimate Karate Punch in the Face

It’s the wind up, it’s the karate punch, it’s the…oops!

Good Lard is it a beeootifull day, especially for the ultimate karate punch..

Good day to work out, limber up the muskles, knock the fat off yer frame. Get healthy. Ya know? Are ya ready to talk martial arts?

horse stance, punch

Click on this guy to get the ultimate karate punch.

kenpo karate instructor manual

Click on the book to find out about the man who killed Kenpo Karate.

One of the drills I hated the most, but got the most out of, was the simple horse stance. We would spread the legs, get the thighs down to where they were almost parallel to the floor, and put up one high block, and extend the other hand to the side in a chicken beak, and look at our finger tips. We called this position Kima Chasie. Horse Meditation.

And we meditated on the pain it would cause us.

Now, forget the pain, forget the stronger legs, forget everything but the real purpose of it. Get out of your body.

After a couple of years of dabbling with horse Meditation I decided to do it right. I decided that pain wouldn’t cause death (in this instance) and that I should just do the exercise until I got what it was all about.

So, I hit the stance, looked at my fingers, and concentrated on breathing. Time passed. Minutes seemed like hours. My mind began to still, the world slowed down. Seconds seemed like hours.

And, suddenly it all stopped hurting. No pain at all. The whole universe was one peaceful concept that i could live with forever.

How long did it take me to get there?

Five minutes.

That’s all.

Zingo bingo, instant enlightenment.

Doing the Horse Stance Form and techniques at 61.

Now came the problem. When I tried to move, I couldn’t. My whole body had locked up. Man, I was freaked. Tried to wiggle backwards, couldn’t move, couldn’t even rock. Tried forwards, ah, there we go, I could fall for…oh shit…ah! Landed on my face.

So, enlightenment is possible through the old training methods, but sometimes it can be weird, freaky, and even as significant as a karate punch on the nose.

Hey, any of youse guys feel like coming over to see me, I live on good old Monster Martial Arts. Brings your friends, the doors are open, leave your old life outside.

See ya.

Al

Here’s a great article on how to be Karate tough. If you can take it. Grrr.

Karate, Kung Fu and Aikido Against Voodoo Martial Arts

 Martial Arts: a Destructive Method as Opposed to a Real Method

What you are really trying to do, in martial arts such as Karate and Aikido, and the various types of Kung Fu, is to increase observation while decreasing distance. This is not an exactitude of martial arts practice, but it is the accurate analysis of what we are trying to do.

So you have a beginning martial arts student from one of these classical disciplines, and you launch a slow attack from six feet away. And, as a the months go on, you speed up the attack, and the student gets better and better, faster and faster, and once he reaches a certain point of comfort – that it is comfort is very important, you shorten the distance.

So you launch the attack from three feet away, and you do it slowly, and again, you speed it up over the months. The student gets ‘comfortable’ – remember that word – and you shorten the distance again.

And, you keep shortening the distances until the student is able to stand and observe, not flinch back, and see what is happening, and he is simply becoming more aware.

It’s funny, the martial arts, such as aikido, kung fu, karate, especially the classical ones, are one of the few methods for increasing awareness on this planet. Things like school actually decrease awareness. They jam facts and figures into the head, and it is a rare student, probably a non-existent student, who comes out smarter than when he went in.

But that’s because education doesn’t deal in the real world, except for the sciences, which most people shy away from, and which schools, to remain viable, allow them to. Poor, little darlings (keep writing the check Mommie!)  we’ll get them through something tough, like music appreciation.

Anyway, sorry for that aside, but it is important that you understand the importance of the martial arts on this planet and in your life, so let’s get back to time and distance and awareness.

Awareness is how much of the world you see. And in the martial arts you present a motion, make the student look at it until he is comfortable, then cut the time and make him see more. Cutting the time will enable him to see more.

Now, here is the trick, some of the more modern martial arts, arts based on reality training and so forth, don’t take the time to go through this method, or any other similar working method for increasing awareness.

What they do is increase reaction time.

Now, the student may become more aware in a certain realm, but it is out of his control, he is not able to summon awareness at will, and his body and senses are at risk.

It is the procedure of going to war and depending upon the fact that you are in deathly danger to raise your awareness. It is not a tried and true and scientific method.

It works, but how are you going to teach it without hurting people?

And this method, of forcing increased awareness, of a sort that can be erroneously compared to a real discipline, by putting people in harm’s way usually relies on such terms ‘adrenaline dumping,’ or builds a terminology that is scientific in nature, but psychological in fact. And, the sad thing, psychology is not a science, but merely a voodoo accumulation of whimsical tricks and that sometimes work, if you blunder along long enough. The simple fact of the matter is that psychology, while it has enabled some people under mental stress to go on with their lives, it has never gotten to the bottom of why they weere under stress int he first place, except in the most superficial manner, i.e., some bizarre explanation of wanting to have sex with their mother or father, it’s some one else’s fault, and so on.

The real key here is in the concept of ‘comfort’ under stress.

If your martial art, if  your karate or aikido or kung fu, or even your eclectic discipline, is causing you to relax, to be ‘comfortable,’ when the fist flies towards your face, it is a true art.

And, if you are relying on adrenaline dumping, or touting the fact that you must, simply must try it all out in reality, in a real situation or real fight, to make sure it works, then you are practicing one more savage method, thought up by savages, to retain their savagery.

Savage methods, voodoo training theory, they are a poor excuse for increasing awareness by relaxing, for seeing more of the world simply by applying yourself and making yourself grow through hard work and forcing yourself, I say ‘forcing yourself,’ to see more of the world by learning how to relax under stress.

While the martial arts theory  presented here is pure, it is not practical to apply except in specific exercises; the process of matrixing is the accumulation of many of these specific, and scientific, methods. Further, by being an actual science, and by addressing the actual fact of increasing awareness through such theory as described above, matrixing increases speed of learning by up to ten times, and this in ANY martial art, be it karate, kung fu, aikido, or whatever.

You can find specific Matrix theory and methods at Monster Martial Arts. This includes exact matrixing courses such as Matrix Karate, Matrix Kung Fu, Matrix Aikido, Matrixing weapons, and so on.

 

How to Break Through to a Real Black Belt

What is the difference between a Black Belt and a ‘real’ Black Belt?

Interesting question, eh?

To explain this let me make a statement, and then explain how that statement works.

The statement is that a real black belt does less to create more.

Now, back in China, there were people who could do less to make more. They learned this over millennium, and it became a part of their cultural teachings in many of the martial arts.

The art trailed to Okinawa, and the concept tried to hang on. In some respects it did, in others it didn’t.

Then the Japanese (among others, they weren’t alone in this, just more efficient) came along and they said, ‘We want power!’ So they made the work outs brutal, putting force above intelligence, or awareness, and they succeeded in deep sixing the already dying concept of ‘doing less to create more.’

And, they are not the only ones who did this. Americans are guilty of going along with this, not just as students, but as ‘power seekers’ on their own.

Now, power is fine, for a beginner. But when you train in the martial arts you progress to a point where you get tired – that’s as good a way of putting it as any – of working so durned hard.

Part of this realization may come from finally seeing through the blinders of power to the fact that a little bit wisely and judiciously applied accomplishes just as much, and more, than a lot blindly applied.

But you finally realize the truth, that it is not how much power you can create, but how smartly you focus your awareness to create and apply that power. Thus, the more you become empty, before and after the focus, relaxing to do the technique, the less power you actually have to summon up.

You do less, and create larger effects. You punch lightly, and it hurts more. You relax and throw more efficiently.

You are not building muscles now, but rather awareness; you are learning to focus, to use, awareness as a power. Call it chi, if you wish.

This concept had millennium to take root and develop in China, and teachers would teach it from the get go (before the Great Cultural Revolution). Now people only attain it rarely, and not if they stick to the power seeking commercial schools that have come to reign.

Here’s the interesting thing: you measure force, the power of a beginner, with physics. But you cannot measure chi with physics.

For you cannot measure awareness, especially when used in this manner.

Now, the hallmark of the real black belt is not how much power he has, but how light and liquid he is; how empty he is; how measured and sure he is of his position in space. How aware he is.

Learn to do more by using less (force, impact, energy, whatever) and you will be a real Black Belt.

You can subscribe by going to the top of the sidebar…

A god example of physics and real martial arts is my Pan Gai Noon book, available in paper or kindle on Amazon.

Wing Chun Karate is Interesting…

Wing Chun and Karate?

Wing Chun and Karate, seemingly opposites, but not. Actually, I found more similarities between Wing Chun and Karate than almost any other martial arts.

Wing Chun, of course, is the Chinese Martial Art that has soft blocks, which is to say guiding blocks, and hard strikes. It has been around for hundreds of years, and it is quite sophisticated. A person who has actually reached the ‘inner circle’ of this Chinese Martial Art is quite untouchable, can fight blindfolded, has a full range of sixth senses having to do with anticipating attacks before they happen, and so forth.
wing chun gung fu

The main difference here is the direction of the blocks.

Wing Chun blocks tend to come back towards the body.

In Karate blocks tend to go away from the body.

In either art, if you are moving the block sideways, you are doing the block wrong, for there is no body, and therefore no possible body alignment behind the block.

And, yes, whether you are blocking hard or soft there must be body and alignment of structure behind the blocks. You can’t overwhelm the attacker’s strikes (as inKarate) if you don’t have this body and structure, and you can’t effectively guide the attack if you don’t have this body and structure.

Now, that all said, take a look at ‘Wing Chun Kung Fu,’ by James Yimm Lee, and you will find a section on the eight gates and four doors. Is this not perfectly transferable to Karate?

And, once you understand this, and if you are in a real style of Karate, you will understand how the concepts of grounding and deep stances must be used. And, if you are in this style of hung fu, and come across Karate, you may realize ho more effective, especially the early training, would if you deepened the stances and worked on the grounding and alignment.

Thus, these styles of Japanese Martial Art and Chinese Martial Art do have more than surface similarities, and it is even of high benefit to study both systems. You must not try to blend them however, past what I have said here. That would muddle either art, cause confusion, and detract from both Wing Chun and Karate.

If you wish to go further with the concepts outlined in this article on Wing Chun and Karate you should examine Matrixing at MonsterMartialArts.com, a specific course that would apply would be the Master Instructor Course.

The Evolution from Martial to Art

How the Martial Arts Change…

Man, end of the week coming up,
getting ready,
did two work outs yesterday,
Felt S-O-O-O good.
And it’s just from working out.

martial arts novel

Get a free PDF of the Martial Arts novel ‘Assassin.’
Read it, and if you find it worthy, review it.
Write me at aganzul@gmail.com for your free PDF.
Click on the cover for more information about the novel itself.

Now,
here’s how it happens.
Somebody learns how to kill somebody.
This is using his bare hands.
Maybe it is to fight against bandits,
or as part of a military mission,
or whatever.
Then,
he practices,
and he lives,
maybe he survives,
and maybe he teaches.

Interested in the killing ways,
this fellow keeps his eyes open,
learns all manner of techniques,
and he practices.
And practices and practices.
Eventually,
he accumulates enough data
to realize a truth about himself.
By accumulating pieces of art,
he puts the arts together,
and
in the process
puts himself together.
At this point the killing techniques
become an art.
A matter of self expression.
Enlightenment.

As this fellow passes his art down,
maybe to his sons,
maybe to paying students,
whatever,
the things he learned and taught
become quite methodical
and more and more people
realize the things he did.

His system becomes a CCS
a Closed Combat System.

It has sufficient breadth and depth,
to always work
if people do it as prescribed.

It is a matter of evolution.
It is a matter of generation after generation
honing the material,
figuring out more and more things
to make that system work.

And,
it is a matter of students
not changing the system,
except in ways that bolster the system.

The few students who don’t complete the art,
or leave with improper understanding,
end up without a complete system,
and they are at risk of adding things to that system
that don’t belong.

That brings us to the modern age.
And students who hoped on a plane in Japan as green belts,
and got off the plane in America
as black belts.

That brings us to students who quit their system
and
because they didn’t have enough to teach,
started adding things indiscriminately.

That brings us to people who destroyed
the evolutionary accumulation
that is what we call a Closed Combat System.

That brings us to an age
where there are so many systems,
the glut of information is so much,
and well meaning instructors try to include everything,
swelling their systems
without regard for how everything fits together.

Go on,
learn Aikido,
then introduce a front punch in the middle of every technique.
There goes the concept of harmony.
There goes Aikido,
no longer a CCS.

Or,
how about taking a system of jujitsu,
and altering every technique for tournament play.
There goes jujitsu.

Or,
or…or…or…
There are actually very few Closed Combat Systems left.
There are actually very few teachers
who understand what has been done to their art.

Think of it like software.
You are learning algebra through a software program,
then,
7th lesson,
you are handed all sorts of material
having to do with growing watermelons.

Man,
would you shake your head or what?

You might obsess on watermelons,
or you might give up algebra,
or you might start teaching people
the necessary algebra
that you just made up
to grow watermelons.

Weird, eh?

Here’s the thing.
There is martial,
which is war,
which is how to kill somebody.

Then,
if a person learns enough,
if he learns enough stuff
so that the whole thing makes sense,
then it becomes an art.

If you know a single art,
you only know one viewpoint,
and you have little chance of learning the whole.

If you learn an art that is corrupted,
bereft of unified concepts,
then you will degrade the art to martial.
You will go from learning to express yourself as a human being
and devolve to espousing tricks to kill people.

So what is the value of being a human being?
Well,
if you are learning tricks to kill,
then you don’t know,
and all I can say is…
learning to express yourself
is higher on the evolutionary chain
than killing people.

Interesting concepts, eh?

here is my page…

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/the-true-way-of-the-martial-arts/

So here’s my page,
got most of my stuff on it,
It’s the largest accumulation
of pure martial arts knowledge
in the history of the world.

Oh, there are larger collections,
I’m sure,
but they are going to be collections of systems
that are not CCS.
Massive put togethers
without regard for concept
where the ‘software’ is corrupted,
and the student doesn’t come together,
but falls apart.

True.

Okey dokey,
have yourself a great week end.
Party hearty,
and workout like you mean it.

Al

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How to Stay Grounded in the Martial Arts

Sunday Morning and the Martial Arts!

My day of …work out.
On the seventh day he…worked out?
Something to think about, eh?

But,
remember,
you don’t get where you’re going
by being a lazy so and so.
You get there by being
a lean, mean, work out machine.

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Neutronic concepts in verse…click on the cover!

So,
where are you going?
There are stages of development,
you know.

First stage,
how do you tie a belt,
oh, forgot to bow,
how do I remember what to do.
Man, this is a LOT of work!

Then you get to black belt.
Lot’s of signposts before then,
but it’s still one stage,
reaction time disappears,
intuition appears,
and you absorb some mighty powerful stuff.

Second stage,
what the heck do I do now?
Do I practice this one art?
Work my way up the higher belt levels?
Do I sample other arts?
What do I do about this attack of pride
that seems to have lodged in my soul?

Third stage,
what the heck is this all about?
Do you see the progression here?
It is all about finding answers.
First you want to fight,
then you want to learn,
and it’s always about making decisions,
finding your way,
accumulating data until…?

If you are in an art that is competition oriented,
your progress is often truncated
when you get to old to compete.

If you are in an art with no roots,
an eclectic art,
then you either go away,
or you start searching for roots.
Lot of Kenpo people get involved with this one.
I was heavily there,
back in 69.

Some people make the transition
from learning
to teaching.
This is good,
because you actually learn more when you teach.
BUT,
there are some very serious roadblocks here.
Have you answered enough questions in your own mind,
to answer questions in others minds?
Are you teaching because you love the art?
Or because you love the domination?
This is a hard one,
especially considering what the martial arts are:
a discipline for dominating.
But teaching,
real teaching,
is different.
It is not about dominating,
it is about sharing.
Makes it hard to balance discipline with having fun.
Love of teaching is not enough.
Many instructors fall into this category,
they love to teach,
and they aren’t very good martial artists,
but the authority of the position
is very magnetic.
Electric.
A close cousin to domination,
without realizing it.

The problem here
is that nobody really knows how to teach.
They monkey see monkey do
how they were taught.
They follow the same method
that has been used for thousands of years.
A method designed for people
who weren’t literate,
who had no logic.
And they do this
even though the system they are teaching
is being degraded by all manner of influences,
including and sometimes especially
modern teaching methods.

I got lucky.
I studied with a fellow who didn’t talk.
He smiled,
he laughed,
he offered no opinion
just let us learn.
He didn’t inject himself into the teachings.
I studied for near seven years,
In that time he said maybe a dozen things.

‘A tight fist is a heavy fist.’

‘There are many paths to the top of the mountain.’

And so on.

Honestly,
I don’t remember the things he said,
I remember the feeling when he stepped on the mat,
the electrical current running up my legs.
I remember stepping on the mat myself
and suddenly being swept up
in a desire to work out
that was unlike anything
I had ever experienced.

Nobody ever dominated,
because he never dominated.

Nobody ever got lost in odd explanations of why this technique worked because of the neural synapsis that fired when the fight or flight syndrome was engaged because of the direction of the attacker’s eyes when…

All we did was the forms,
and we tried things,
and when the things didn’t work,
he was there to show us what did work.

That was the essence of the education,
you know,
to find out what worked.

When you find out what works
it answers all questions.
When you are lost in explanations offered
by people who want to be teachers,
or fighters,
or something other than martial artists,
then you end up thinking that the things that don’t work
will work.
The whole class skews.
The art skews.

When you get the explanation for what works,
by being directed to do the form,
and to find out what works,
then you learn the art.
And,
then you aren’t swayed into mystique land
or lost in the illogics,
or lose your roots.

Your roots are you.
After you do the forms
the way they are supposed to be done,
in silence and looking for what works,
then you answer your questions,
there are no more mysteries,
and you are left with you.

A greater blessing has no man.

Anyway,
thanks for letting me rant,
hope it helps.
And there is always
The Master Instructor Course,
if you need a little extra
in the way of instruction.
Works for every student,
every teacher,
because it is grounded in how the universe actually works
and it is rooted in the truth of you.

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/4-master-instructor-course/

Now,
have a great Sunday,
or whatever day you get this on.
Remember,
any day can be a day of rest…
any day can be a day of work out.

Have a great work out!
Al

Practicality of Combat Style Karate Kata, and…

…What a Modern Classical Karate Kata Looks Like

With the advent of Krav Maga, Systema, Sanshou, Jeet Kune Do and MMA people don’t fight like they used to, and one has to examine the functionality of Combat Karate Katas.

People are faster, more vicious, more likely to use power base kicks rather than simple jab type front kicks, and worse they like to go to the ground.

What does this mean for the traditional combat style kata?  Does this mean they are useless?

Personally, I don’t think so.  However, other people do.

While I do not suppose I can speak for him,  Kancho Joko Ninomiya, the founder of Enshin appears to feel that kata are necessary but the old ones don’t quite cut it in the modern world.

If you are unfamiliar with Enshin, here is a quick run down on it.  Kancho Joko Ninomiya won the 1974 All Japan Karate Championships (a Kyokushin bare-knuckle full contact championship).  Then he moved to America and founded his own karate style, using his own bare-knuckle tournament to evolve the style.

When he started to create his own kata, he kept the traditions of kata, but made them fit the new style.  He also didn’t bother with fancy names, instead the names are things like “shiro obi no kata”, or “ao obi no kata”, literally they are “white belt kata” and “blue belt kata” respectively.  However, they include things that were heavily used in Kyokushin, but don’t exist in the original katas like Sanchin and Seisan, things like boxing style jab/cross combinations.

So, this is what a modern kata looks like, and following that are its bunkai (application).

Interested in more combat style Karate? Check out Temple Karate at MonsterMartialArts.com

Defining the Ultimate Karate Form…Sanchin

The Real Truth of Sanchin Kata

Guest Blog by Alaric Dailey

It has been said that if you don’t know Sanchin, you don’t know karate. I suppose there is some truth to this.

Sanchin is taught in many variations, the least modified version of which, appears to be the Pangainoon/Uechi-ryu variation.   This is because of all the Naha-te styles, Pangainoon has been “out of China” the least amount of time.  This also happens to be the version I know, so I will be comments from the point of view of how it was taught to me, and why it is that way.

sanchin kata pan gai noon

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Sanchin means three battles, those three battles are “order”, “form” and “breathing”.  These are the same 3 battles that you fight every time you learn a form.  You learn the order of the moves, how to do them properly, working out how they flow together (the form), and how to extract every ounce of internal and external power, both of which are enhanced with breathing.

Part of the proper form is “loose-tight”, which is quite the trick in Sanchin, since it is a dynamic tension form.  However, you have to loosen, your muscles to strike with force, to block with speed, and to tighten them as you are struck with the body checking.

Part of every form is to clear your mind and attempt to perform it with “mushin”, the “no-mind” of zen.

Truly Sanchin, is a very difficult form.  Pangainoon/Uechi-ryu, teaches it as the first form, and expects you to test on it at every belt, and to improve on it.  Other styles, such as Isshin-ryu, Goju-ryu, Kyokushin, and Okinawan Kenpo treat it as an advanced kata, in some cases styles have made it the shodan (blackbelt) kata.

It is interesting, that you also see the “aikido unbendable arm” as the guard, or Wing Chun stylists would recognize it as Tan-sao. I see many people holding their sanchin arms much lower than I was taught, Sensei always said your fingertips should be eye-level. My Wing Chun Sifu says the same thing about tan-sao, of course NOT holding the tan-sao at this level meant that Bruce Lee found it useless, so he through it out of JKD.

Just for a point of interest, here are a few different versions of the form.

And here is a White Crane form named the same thing that appears to be the same form

 

 

I personally don’t believe that the unaltered white crane form was the one taught to the Okinawans, we see far too much tiger in the Okinawan karate versions, a greater emphasis on external power, tiger claw strikes etc.

About the Author: Alaric Daily began practicing the martial arts in 1992. Martial Art she has studied include Pangainoon, Karate, Kenpo, Wing Chun, Krav Maga, Judo, Jujitsu, Aikido, Bagua Zhang, and Tai Chi Chuan

Whatever Happened to Dojo Kun?

Politeness in the Dojo…What Happened?

I remember the first time I took a Karate class, I THOUGHT I knew what I was in for, I had watched many martial arts movies.

That first class surprised me in so many ways.

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Click on the cover for the latest book in the Matrixing Karate series.

“Kiostske!” and everyone ran to position, I was signaled to go to the last spot and we all faced the front of the dojo (shomen).

“Seiza! kneel at attention right leg first, then left, knees 1 fist apart” Sensei started.

“Me wo tojite! Close your eyes, and meditate, lips slightly open, jaw relaxed, breath in through your nose and out through your mouth.   Let the worries of the outside pass away.  Clear your mind, this is training time.”

I sat there quietly wondering what this was all about, I had some other thoughts that were arrogant and rude, I must say that in hind sight my association with this particular sensei may have been the best thing to ever happen to me, but that is another story.

At this point Sensei said “me wo akete, open your eyes” and after a brief pause yelled “dojo-kun!”

The most senior student in class loudly proclaimed the single word “titles”, and everyone responded the next line

“Manners”

“Be humble respectful and courteous above all!”

“Peace”

“Observe the way of peace and teamwork!”

“Drive”

“Practice with all the drive you have, and strive for more than you think you have”

“Courage”

“Have true courage in all facets of life”

“Self-improvement”

“Strive for individual achievement for the benefit of others”

There was more to the beginning ceremony, but at this point I was very confused.

I found out later that it is the morals of the school, repeated before and after class to drill it in to our heads.  Morals is probably a bad translation, but “rules” doesn’t seem to fit either.

The more I thought about it, the more sense the opening ceremony and dojo-jun made.  After all it is karate-do, not karate-jitsu (link to the do vs jitsu article).

In the years since then I am amazed that more styles don’t include dojo-kun, and more mind-settling ceremonies.  As an example, a few years later, I switched to Kenpo Karate and was struck by the blatant rudeness of the instructor.  Gone was Dojo-kun, gone was the humbleness of the students, gone was the friendly atmosphere, gone was the Japanese, even referring to Sensei as such, it was just “Sir”.

The “Kenpo Creed”, written by Mr. Ed Parker Jr., sounds more like a half-hearted apology for having to beat people up, than it does a set of rules to live by.

I come to you with only Karate; “empty hands.” I have no weapons, but should I be forced to defend myself, my principles or my honor.  Should it be a matter of life or death, right or wrong, then here are my weapons, Karate; “empty hands.”

This has always rubbed me the wrong way, of course, the fact that he dropped “do” and “jitsu” from his arts name may indicate something.  His choice of “empty hand” in the creed is also interesting, since the character on the patch is the homonym for empty, but it means “Tang Dynasty China”, so it literally means “Chinese hand” not “empty hand”, but that is another story.

Kenpo isn’t the only style to eliminate Dojo-kun, and of the schools I have studied in, those that eliminate Dojo-kun, are always less friendly, they are less patient, ruder, and generally not as well behaved.

The “Tao Te Ching” says in poem 38

Failing Tao, man resorts to Virtue.
Failing Virtue, man resorts to humanity.
Failing humanity, man resorts to morality.
Failing morality, man resorts to ceremony.
Now, ceremony is the merest husk of faith and loyalty;
It is the beginning of all confusion and disorder.

I have to think that we have drifted so far, that ceremony is our first step to get back on the road.  Dojo-kun shouldn’t be necessary; we should all be wonderful people without having to repeat it.  I feel strongly though that dojo-kun should continue to be part of every school, especially those teaching children, because we can all use the reminder to be better people.

119 Karate Lessons, all the way to Black Belt, for only $50!

Extreme Martial Arts Workout!

The Boulder in Your Backyard

Good weekend to you!
You know what I’m going to say…
work out!
It’s the best way
to make yourself better.

Oinkly donkey,
let’s talk about hard core.
One of my favorite stories is Mas Oyama.
Mas was a Korean
who went to Japan after WW2.
He wanted to study Karate,
and the Japanese,
(Shotokan, I believe)
wouldn’t let him.
Word is…
they actually peed on him.
Well,
this didn’t sit well with Mas,
so he went up into the mountains,
spent a year in seclusion.
Training.
Doing his forms.
Practicing breaking techniques
on boulders.
Yes.
Take a frozen boulder,
chop with the hand,
and it breaks.
Anybody up for that?

So,
a year passes,
and Mas figures
he hasn’t been in the mountains long enough.
Hasn’t run barefoot through the snow long enough.
So…
he spends another year
in the freezing snow,
doing his forms,
breaking boulders with a chop.
Grrr.

Then he comes down,
goes back to the Japanese
and…
somebody gimme a towel…
there seems to be blood on the floor!

Mopped up those suckers.

Now,
I read this story,
several places,
and it was in a movie,
and there seems to be enough truth to it.

What is interesting
is that instructor knew Mas.

My instructor was a skinny, little guy.
But he studied with Don Buck,
and Don was Mas Oyama’s favorite American.
so Bob had to have met and known
this Karate legend.
Interesting.

But,
what I am more interested in
is the work outs Mas must have done.

I live on a mountain,
and I have to chop wood or I freeze.
I have to plant crops,
or food gets scarce.
There work to be done around here.
Sometimes it seems like
there isn’t much time for a work out.

but there is.
There is always time.
You just decide what you want to do
and then you make your life work.
Sometimes it’s tough.
Life says you got to do something else.
But,
you don’t.

Want to hear a neutronic truth?

If you don’t do,
EGG ZACKLY
what you want to do,
then you are wasting your life.

Yes,
you have to live,
you have to work,
you have to contribute
to the society around you.
BUT,
you still have a higher duty to yourself.

So…
if you want to work out,
and life starts getting in the way,
you just bully life
into doing what you want.

I can’t tell you how important this is.

Sometimes it is tough,
sometimes it is easy,
but…
you still have to make life do what you want it to.

Heck,
it is YOUR life.
Not some politician’s,
not your daddy’s,
not your child’s,
not your boss’s,
not anybody but yours.

So,
here comes the question…
do you have a boulder in your backyard?
No,
you don’t have to live in the mountains.
Heck,
Mas had to be crazy, right?
Anybody who feels he has to go live in the wilderness
to be a better person…
that guy has to be nuts.
Right?
Grin.

BUT…
do you have a boulder in your backyard?
It’s a simple thing.
Or a stack of bricks?
Or a 100 foot tall redwood for a maki wara?
Or some other way to practice your basics
every single day.

You see,
when you get down and dirty,
when you reach the state of mind
that requires breaking snow covered boulders
in the high, high mountains,
you realize something…
it is not that fancy form that is so important,
it is not that complex move
that you wouldn’t have time to do in a fight.
It is your basics.
It is breathing into your movement,
sinking your weight
and aligning,
figuring out how to let go
so that energy comes out of you
with no effort.

So,
do you have a boulder in your backyard?

Have a great work out!

Al

Here’s the link for…THE PUNCH

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/hard-punch/

That’ll help you make little rocks out of big rocks.

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