Category Archives: kwon bup

Greatest Day in Martial Arts History!

Happy Martial Arts Memorial Day!

Happy work out!
And happy you!
Why should you be so happy?
Well,
you’re about to get a fantastic deal.

First,
it is my birthday.
Got to be the greatest day
in the history of the martial arts,
right?
And,
two times a year,
my birthday and Christmas,
I ask you something.
I ask you to forgive me.
This is a serious thing.
If I said the wrong thing,
offended you somehow,
didn’t deliver exactly what I promise,
forgive me.
And let me know if there is something
that I need to do
to make it right.

Here’s the deal…
people make mistakes.
I deal with thousands of people a month,
so I have a lot of opportunity to make mistakes.
I have a lot of opportunity to build up ill will.
So,
if I messed up,
and I can erase ill will
even if I don’t know what it is,
then it keeps my personal universe
happy and functioning.

So,
forgive me.

Now,
that said,
let’s talk about why you should be happy!

Birthdays and Christmas,
time for presents,
right?
Everybody should get lots of presents
all the time.
Heck,
life is short,
we should live happy,
and why not?
Right?

So the present is this.
Until June 5th, 2014,
all download courses
are two for one.
You buy a course,
you get an extra one.
FREE.
My thanks for forgiving the world,
and forgiving me,
for any mistakes or ill will.

I can’t do this for courses I have to mail.
And the courses should be of around the same value.
You pay 30 bucks,
find another course for thirty bucks.
Order,
then email me with a happy birthday greeting,
and say you want a second course free.
I’ll send the second course
probably within 24 hours.
I’m on the computer a lot,
I check my mail,
so I’ll get back to you,
probably within 24.
If I don’t,
email me again,
mama google messed up.
My email is

aganzul@gmail.com

And,
if there is a small difference between course prices,
ask me.
When I’m celebrating
and all happy
it’s pretty easy to start talking about blinding steel
with a thirty dollar course.
Or the Black Belt course,
if you’ve already order a forty dollar course.

Okey dokey?
Did it make you happy?
Excellent!

So,
read it again,
make sure you understand,
then pet the dog,
shave the cat,
or whatever,
then…
order.
And,
no limits.
You want more than one course,
go for it.
It’s two for one,
no limits.

Happy birthday to me,
and happy memorial day to you,
and…I guess that’s it.

HAVE A GREAT WORK OUT!

Al

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/

two courses for the price of one,
of comparable or almost comparable value,
no limits on number of courses,
no physical mailing courses,
no books from Amazon,
only downloads,
send me an email if you have questions.
aganzul@gmail.com

Hitting Harder in the Martial Arts!

How to Hit Harder in the Martial Arts!

I had an interesting question today
this from a person who didn’t study the martial arts
He asked me
“How do you break those bricks and boards
and not end up with arthritis
in your hands?”

Good question, eh?
The reason
I told him
is that it is not how hard you hit,
it is hitting gently
and letting the power accumulate
over the years.

I remember my brother
back when Karate first hit the news,
punching a telephone pole
to make his hands tough.
He ended up with bruised and bleeding knuckles
that hurt for months.
And,
sorry to say,
there are schools of martial arts
that do that type of training
to this day.
They believe in
‘no pain no gain,’
which is one of the worst sayings ever.

Look,
pain is a warning,
a signal that you are in danger
that you might get hurt.
You don’t ignore pain.
You learn to edge it,
to use it,
but you never deliberately hurt yourself.
That’s like printing
‘stupid’
on your forehead.

But,
you put up a makiwara,
you tack some rug pads to a tree,
you hang a heavy bag,
and you hit it not hard,
but softly,
gently,
just hard enough to feel it.
Then you don’t bruise your knuckles,
you make your whole arm strong
working out day after day.

You don’t change your body…
you change the way you think about the universe.

And,
that leads us to the second part of this thing.
There are three depths for striking.
Skin deep,
muscle deep,
bone deep.

To hit the skin never causes a bruise.
It pulls the punch,
and you can strike as hard as you want
nobody gets hurt.

BUT…your punches don’t develop real power.

So you punch a little harder, to the muscle.
This can cause a bruise,
so you have to learn how to tighten your muscles,
or,
how to hit just barely hard enough
to rock the muscle
but not bruise it.

This needs a high degree of control,
but you know what I say,

there is an art to destruction,
but the true art is in control.

Now,
the third depth of striking
is to strike to the bone.
This causes bruises every time,
and puts the bones at risk.
You can,
with a little practice
break bones pretty easily.

This depth of striking
takes a lot of awareness,
not a lot of mindless bashing,
but a lot of concentration
and focus,
and awareness of what,
exactly,
you are hitting.

There’s a great book,
‘Iron and Silk’
by Mark Saltzman.
Got made into a movie.
Guy goes to China and learns Kung Fu.
Well,
the guy who taught him
was famous,
was in movies,
and one of his training regimens was
to strike a piece of metal 2000 times a day.
He would just walk around
holding a little plate of metal,
and punch it.

When they shot the movie
they asked him to hit the plate,
and he did,
and the sound of his knuckles striking metal
made everybody sick.
They had to dub in the sound.

Now,
that is a punch
developed over time.
When you see the movie you realize
he is not hitting the plate hard,
just doing it
over and over and over,
and,
a couple of decades,
and the mere sound of that punch,
makes people sick.

Now,
go read the book,
rent the movie,
really fascinating stuff.

Okay,
so are you working out a lot?
Do you have a sheet of paper hanging on your bedroom door,
so you can see it every day?
Or taped to the mirror in your bathroom,
reminding you to work out?

Think about this punching thing,
about the three levels of striking,
and where you want to be in your martial arts.
Not tomorrow,
but in a couple of decades.

Go on,
make a plan,
stick to it,
and answer the question that guy asked me.

And,
that said,
if you have books on the martial arts,
feel free to donate them to Monkeyland.
My email is aganzul@gmail.com.
Check your shelves out
maybe you have an old Bruce Tegner book,
or a DVD that you are no longer interested in,
send me an email,
and I’ll send you my address up here.

And,
sorry to say,
but you
will even have to spring for the postage.
We just don’t have the cash up here.
But,
the idea is to have
the greatest martial arts library in the world.
So if you have anything to contribute,
it would be appreciated.
Some day in the near future
I’ll make a list of books
we have in the library.

But,
wouldn’t it be great
for people to come up
and not just learn the best martial arts in the world,
but to have access to EVERY single other martial art?
To be able to do research into other martial arts?

Now,
that’s about all this week.
Check out this URL

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/3a-blinding-steel-matrixing-weapons/

And have a GREAT work out!

Al

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/3a-blinding-steel-matrixing-weapons/

When Kicks are King!

The Best Martial Arts Kicks in the World!

I was okay with kicks
back when I was starting out.
Kicks were a new thing,
hadn’t ever used those muscles before,
but it was pretty easy to follow along in class
so I was okay.

chinese hand karate martial art

Complete art, a pivotal time in matrixing ~ click on the cover!

BUT,
as time progressed I noticed something,
there were guys in class that had GREAT kicks.
These guys were strong and fluid,
they could use their feet like delicate tools,
and knock you on your fanny!
So I went to one of the instructors
and asked why this one guy was so good with his kicks.

“He does 200 kicks per kick per side.”

I blinked.
I was doing ten kicks per kick per side.
I thought I was toughening
getting strong
improving at a wild rate.
Nope.

So,
I was fortunate enough to have a job
where I sat on my butt and watched a machine.
Sounds funny to say something like that
but,
that’s what I did.
So I got up off my butt
and I began doing 250 kicks per kick per side.
Hey!
It wasn’t hard!
Took some time,
and some sweat
and the first few days my legs were pretty tired,
but,
it got to be so much fun
I began doing it two and even three times a day.
And I began looking around for things to kick.
We had these big telephone cable spools,
and I would practice kicking them across the floor
so then I set up stations
and began practicing my multiple kicks.
Man,
it was fun!
And,
the mystery of kicks suddenly resolved
and I learned something…
good kicks are just like walking.
If you walk ten miles a day
then your legs do ten miles of work,
they get used to it.
No big deal.
Same thing with kicks.
And,
I learned something else,

‘Make the legs as flexible as the arms,
make the arms as powerful as the legs.’

Things were different after that,
I became a LOT more confident,
and I started doing a lot better at freestyle.
Heck,
it changed my whole work ethic!
I started looking at stances differently,
trying to make them as simple as walking.
I began punching big cable spools,
knocking them across the factory floor
I even set up a punching station at home.
I tacked two carpet samples
to a 100 ft tall redwood tree.
It never fell over,
but I sure scared it!
Grrr.

Anyway,
I still work the kicks to this day.
Not as much,
I’m more into forms,
but,
I make sure I do the following stretching routine
several times a day.

20 – 50 deep squats
20 leg raises front and side
20 single leg squats
(leg on a rail and deep bend with supporting leg)
20 single leg squats
(squat on one leg – stand – squat other leg)
Some jumping jacks to loosen it all up.

Now,
I’m all over the place
up here at Monkeyland.
It’s nothing to walk ten miles
checking the fence.
It’s nothing to take a twenty mile hike back into the BLM lands.
It’s nothing to hike up a mountain and down.
And I still do fast, snappy kicks,
strong enough to knock over a bull.
So this leg regimen I recommend
as a true fountain of youth.
Whether you want strong kicks,
or better stances,
or anything,
do this routine
at the beginning and end of your work out
and the legs are king.

Okey dokey,
here’s the obligatory ad…

http://kangdukwon.com

It’s a site I set up for the sole purpose
of training in a VERY powerful form of Karate.

Now,
be off with you,
and
have a work out that the Gods themselves would envy!

Al

http://kangdukwon.com

The Evolution from Martial to Art

How the Martial Arts Change…

Man, end of the week coming up,
getting ready,
did two work outs yesterday,
Felt S-O-O-O good.
And it’s just from working out.

martial arts novel

Get a free PDF of the Martial Arts novel ‘Assassin.’
Read it, and if you find it worthy, review it.
Write me at aganzul@gmail.com for your free PDF.
Click on the cover for more information about the novel itself.

Now,
here’s how it happens.
Somebody learns how to kill somebody.
This is using his bare hands.
Maybe it is to fight against bandits,
or as part of a military mission,
or whatever.
Then,
he practices,
and he lives,
maybe he survives,
and maybe he teaches.

Interested in the killing ways,
this fellow keeps his eyes open,
learns all manner of techniques,
and he practices.
And practices and practices.
Eventually,
he accumulates enough data
to realize a truth about himself.
By accumulating pieces of art,
he puts the arts together,
and
in the process
puts himself together.
At this point the killing techniques
become an art.
A matter of self expression.
Enlightenment.

As this fellow passes his art down,
maybe to his sons,
maybe to paying students,
whatever,
the things he learned and taught
become quite methodical
and more and more people
realize the things he did.

His system becomes a CCS
a Closed Combat System.

It has sufficient breadth and depth,
to always work
if people do it as prescribed.

It is a matter of evolution.
It is a matter of generation after generation
honing the material,
figuring out more and more things
to make that system work.

And,
it is a matter of students
not changing the system,
except in ways that bolster the system.

The few students who don’t complete the art,
or leave with improper understanding,
end up without a complete system,
and they are at risk of adding things to that system
that don’t belong.

That brings us to the modern age.
And students who hoped on a plane in Japan as green belts,
and got off the plane in America
as black belts.

That brings us to students who quit their system
and
because they didn’t have enough to teach,
started adding things indiscriminately.

That brings us to people who destroyed
the evolutionary accumulation
that is what we call a Closed Combat System.

That brings us to an age
where there are so many systems,
the glut of information is so much,
and well meaning instructors try to include everything,
swelling their systems
without regard for how everything fits together.

Go on,
learn Aikido,
then introduce a front punch in the middle of every technique.
There goes the concept of harmony.
There goes Aikido,
no longer a CCS.

Or,
how about taking a system of jujitsu,
and altering every technique for tournament play.
There goes jujitsu.

Or,
or…or…or…
There are actually very few Closed Combat Systems left.
There are actually very few teachers
who understand what has been done to their art.

Think of it like software.
You are learning algebra through a software program,
then,
7th lesson,
you are handed all sorts of material
having to do with growing watermelons.

Man,
would you shake your head or what?

You might obsess on watermelons,
or you might give up algebra,
or you might start teaching people
the necessary algebra
that you just made up
to grow watermelons.

Weird, eh?

Here’s the thing.
There is martial,
which is war,
which is how to kill somebody.

Then,
if a person learns enough,
if he learns enough stuff
so that the whole thing makes sense,
then it becomes an art.

If you know a single art,
you only know one viewpoint,
and you have little chance of learning the whole.

If you learn an art that is corrupted,
bereft of unified concepts,
then you will degrade the art to martial.
You will go from learning to express yourself as a human being
and devolve to espousing tricks to kill people.

So what is the value of being a human being?
Well,
if you are learning tricks to kill,
then you don’t know,
and all I can say is…
learning to express yourself
is higher on the evolutionary chain
than killing people.

Interesting concepts, eh?

here is my page…

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/the-true-way-of-the-martial-arts/

So here’s my page,
got most of my stuff on it,
It’s the largest accumulation
of pure martial arts knowledge
in the history of the world.

Oh, there are larger collections,
I’m sure,
but they are going to be collections of systems
that are not CCS.
Massive put togethers
without regard for concept
where the ‘software’ is corrupted,
and the student doesn’t come together,
but falls apart.

True.

Okey dokey,
have yourself a great week end.
Party hearty,
and workout like you mean it.

Al

Don’t forget to subscribe to this blog.

Practicality of Combat Style Karate Kata, and…

…What a Modern Classical Karate Kata Looks Like

With the advent of Krav Maga, Systema, Sanshou, Jeet Kune Do and MMA people don’t fight like they used to, and one has to examine the functionality of Combat Karate Katas.

People are faster, more vicious, more likely to use power base kicks rather than simple jab type front kicks, and worse they like to go to the ground.

What does this mean for the traditional combat style kata?  Does this mean they are useless?

Personally, I don’t think so.  However, other people do.

While I do not suppose I can speak for him,  Kancho Joko Ninomiya, the founder of Enshin appears to feel that kata are necessary but the old ones don’t quite cut it in the modern world.

If you are unfamiliar with Enshin, here is a quick run down on it.  Kancho Joko Ninomiya won the 1974 All Japan Karate Championships (a Kyokushin bare-knuckle full contact championship).  Then he moved to America and founded his own karate style, using his own bare-knuckle tournament to evolve the style.

When he started to create his own kata, he kept the traditions of kata, but made them fit the new style.  He also didn’t bother with fancy names, instead the names are things like “shiro obi no kata”, or “ao obi no kata”, literally they are “white belt kata” and “blue belt kata” respectively.  However, they include things that were heavily used in Kyokushin, but don’t exist in the original katas like Sanchin and Seisan, things like boxing style jab/cross combinations.

So, this is what a modern kata looks like, and following that are its bunkai (application).

Interested in more combat style Karate? Check out Temple Karate at MonsterMartialArts.com

Defining Tradition KarateKata

Traditional Kata Parameters

I’d like to talk about what makes a kata a “traditional” kata. I took Taekwondo for a short time, while I was doing so, the instructor told me that at one of the levels, the students had to create their own kata. I watched one of these student created katas, and I was amazed at the fact that they didn’t match any of the rules or conventions of traditional forms. When I asked about it, I was told that those rules don’t apply. I played the good student, and didn’t say anything further..

karate kata traditional

Click on the cover for the latest book in the Matrixing Karate series.

So what are these conventions and rules. Most items are conventions, but there are 2 hard and fast rules that can be counted on.

1. If done properly, you should end on the same spot you started. If you don’t, you screwed up.
2. No kata ever starts with a strike. It is always a block, or block and strike combination.

Conventions that can normally be counted out, include things like the following:

1. Generally symmetrical, this doesn’t mean that every technique is mirrored. Even in combat katas, like seisan, you will see a “balance” in the kata.

2. Will repeat some of the techniques, some times for no other apparent reason than simply repetition.

3. There will be a good mix of stance and footwork changes, and angles.

4. Generally you will not see entirely closed fists and spear hands especially in ancient kata, you will see many more techniques. Koi-no-shippo-uchi and bil-jee finger strikes are perfect examples.

But why does any of this matter? Remember martial arts are for defense, you can’t be on defense if you strike first, at least not for the most part. So blocking first, helps wire into your brain that you are being defensive. All part of becoming a better person.

Stopping where you started serves 2 purposes. The first and most obvious is practicality, if you are doing the form over and over and over, it is nice not to have to re-adjust every single repetition. The second, more important, reason is far less obvious it is “the measured step”. Kung-fu will often explain this far better than other systems. Each step should have a mathematical precision, if you are moving forward and back in the same stance, your stance height, width and depth shouldn’t change. Thus, 10 steps in one direction, and then 10 back, and you should end in the place you started.

The other conventions are simply that, conventions, they are not hard and fast rules. For more understanding of what I have written watch and study the Pangainoon Katas Seisan, and Sanseirui.

[embedhttp://youtu.be/EdVd4sYcXOE[/embed]

Go to monstermartialarts.com and check out Temple Karate for the most evolved Karate patterns in the world. They are matrixed.

Publication of Final Volume of Matrixing Karate Series!

Releasing the Fifth Volume of Matrixing Karate: Master

This is the official announcement that ‘Matrixing Karate: Master,’ has been released.

It was actually finished a couple of weeks ago, and it has had time to get up on Amazon, and it is in the createspace bookstore, so it’s time to make it official.

karate master requirements

Click on the cover for the latest book in the Matrixing Karate series.

The first volume of this pivotal Karate series was dedicated to fixing basic movements. Volumes 2 – 4 were aimed at explaining matrixng principles, introducing matrixing graphs, and so on. Volumes 1 – 4 were based on the Matrix Karate course available at MonsterMartialArts.com.

The fifth and final volume is a bit different. It is based on a series of manuals written over the years, and upon the ‘Create Your Own Art’ video course.

The thing that makes this final book so important, and sets it apart from even the books it was based upon, is that it goes through the history and concepts of Matrixing and details exactly where each concept came from.

Thus, you are taken on a journey, from the first martial art studied by the author, Kenpo Karate, through each and every martial art he studied. This includes detailing concepts from separating two arts successfully (Kang Duk Won and Kwon Bup) and developing a third based on those two. (Outlaw Karate: The Secret of the One Year Black Belt). It goes into the exact influences that resulted in the development of matrixing, including the original matrixing lists from the 70s and 80s, and leads right into the creation of the Matrix graph.

One thing that may be surprising to students of the martial arts is that the author developed matrixing without the matrixing graph. Instead, he used lists of techniques, reworking the lists for every concept he encountered. This actually entailed, literally, thousands of lists. Thus, the development of the Matrixing Graph is a bonus to the martial arts of unparalleled value.

The book may be found on Amazon. It is paperback, and students of the martial arts are encouraged to get the earlier volumes first, that they may better understand the import and significance of this volume.

Subscribe to this blog in the top right sidebar.

Overcoming Pride in the Martial Arts

My martial arts hubris, and how I overcame it

Guest blog by Alaric Dailey

In my other articles I started that my original karate dojo may have been the best thing that ever happened to me.  If you haven’t read them you might find them interesting, especially the ones on Dojo-kun and Do vs Jitsu.

karate internetAmong other things that I rarely see in other schools, each belt test consisted of kata, punching and kicking, hojo-undo etc, but they also included reading a book and a verbal book report.  The very first test was, like many styles, a yellow belt.  I will never understand having a rainbow of colors that DON’T get darker as they go…

That first test was quite an eye opener for me though, Sensei had added his own requirement, because he was not about making money, nor was he interested in having half-hearted students, nor students that would leave.  He wanted people that were going to forever be changed, and continue to practice for the rest of their lives.

The requirement he added?  Go to another martial arts school, and take a minimum of one class with them.  Give a verbal report.

This requirement, was a bit baffling, why take anyone just starting in your school, and require them to go try another school and possibly lose them?  Because it makes sure you are in the art that you will stick with.

For my yellow belt test, I took a 3 day introductory course to Tai-Chi, knowing nothing about any other martial art I made the mistake to trying to compare it to what I knew.  To give you some idea of what kind of apples and broccoli I was trying to compare, I was taking Pangainoon, and the first form you learn is Sanchin and the school I went to was doing Yang Tai Chi.

I made all sorts of uninformed, biased assumptions, I loved karate with a blind passion, and wanted to impress upon my sensei how much karate meant to me.  Thus I took the classes looking for what I perceived to be flaws and weaknesses in the art such as

* no application of technique – never did I get any instruction of “this is a block, this is a strike, this is what you are defending against”
* the stance was too wide – I was not given any explanation for a neutral bow, or why it would be a good stance.  In my mind Sanchin was the ultimate fighting stance.
* No power in their techniques – I had no understanding of chi power, even though Pangainoon teaches it, I hadn’t really even gotten an introduction.

I wilfully and with eyes open wide walked into a trap that ensares so many others.  I blinded myself to the benefits of other arts.

I was lucky that I didn’t entirely discount everything I learned. I continued to keep in contact with the Sifu, and shortly before he left for China, I had the opportunity to witness him do Tai-chi very fast, it was amazing.  Suddenly all the soft flowery techniques appeared to have power, and were obvious as to blocks and strikes.  At this point, I had also had enough Pangainoon to understand some of the techniques and chi.

I was lucky for many reasons, I was lucky that my Sensei had the confidence to send us other places. I was lucky that I choose a school that was so different that I was forced to re-evaluate what I was learning (even if it was only in the back of my mind).

Luck aside, my own belief that my karate style was the only “good” style, quickly crumbling down.  I wouldn’t have been able to overcome this false pride, had I not had these opportunities.

If you run a school, you will do your students a massive favor if you encourage them to go practice with other schools.

If you are a martial artist of any style, you can benefit from swallowing your ego and practising at other schools, especially those that are radically different than yours.  For example, if you do Tai-chi, you might want to try a boxing school, if you do Wing Chun, try Judo or Jujitsu, etc.

You never know, you might might new friends, you might learn something new.  As I often say “more bodies, means more opportunity to learn, especially when they are doing something other than you are doing”.

Do vs Jitsu in the Martial Arts

To Fight or not to Fight

The following is a guest editorial from Alaric Dailey

Being a student of traditional Karate-Do, when I make mention to a school owner or martial artist or parent of a child taking classes somewhere that “martial arts is more than punching and kicking, there is more to being a martial artist than simply being a fighter” I get a blank stare. At this point, I have to explain the following.

martial arts novel

A tale of the Wudan Assassin…click on the cover!

These days, tradition is often poo-pooed with some comment like “if it doesn’t make me a better fighter than I don’t care”.   But being a fighter doesn’t make you a good person, in fact, simply knowing how to fight can make you arrogant, or worse, a bully.

This is often evidenced in “fighter” gyms, people walking around with bad attitudes, all about testosterone and ego, injuries abound because people are always trying to prove they are the king of the mountain.

The way of the warrior, Bushido, is about being a gentle soul, learning not only to punch and kick, but to help others, to be calm and humble.

In other words, learning all those “useless” things, like the language, the manners, the meditation, the discipline, reciting Dojo-kun are not useless, they are about expanding your mind, and making you more than a fighter.

In my original dojo, my sensei not only give us the meditation and such, but would also tell us stories of the Samurai, and give us pieces of Bushido that most westerners never hear.  “Ikebana (flower arranging) is a great way to clear your mind”, and “self-defense is not just about punching and kicking, it is about avoiding and defusing danger in the first place” were words of wisdom that we often heard from sensei.

When the Japanese would teach an art, they would distinguish whether or not it included only fighting techniques, or would give you “the way”.  If you have “the way” it is a Do, Karate-Do, Ju-Do, Aiki-Do, etc.  If it is purely fighting techniques it was Jitsu, Karate-jitsu, Ju-jitsu, Aiki-jitsu, and Nin-jitsu.

As a side note here, you will notice there is no such thing as a “Do” for Ninja fighting techniques.  This is because the ninja weren’t fighters, they were assassins, their skills included, poisons, escape, evasion, not being seen, killing techniques etc.   Being a hired killer, and being a better person have nothing to do with each other.

There are 7 virtues
Rectitude (義 gi)
Courage (勇 yū)
Benevolence (仁 jin)
Respect (禮 rei)
Honesty (誠 makoto)
Honour (名誉 meiyo)
Loyalty (忠義 chūgi)

and 3 more associated virtues
Filial piety (孝 kō)
Wisdom (智 chi)
Care for the aged (悌 tei)

I see it as a great loss that so many have thrown away history and tradition, the Do, in favor of the more testosterone fueled (and MMA fanned) jitsu.  It is a sad state of affairs that our children grow up idolizing real and fictional people who push the ideas “might makes right” and “the ends justifies the means”, never once mentioning justice and mercy.

I highly recommend “The Hagakure”.

Check out the Karate Katas that work.

Extreme Martial Arts Workout!

The Boulder in Your Backyard

Good weekend to you!
You know what I’m going to say…
work out!
It’s the best way
to make yourself better.

Oinkly donkey,
let’s talk about hard core.
One of my favorite stories is Mas Oyama.
Mas was a Korean
who went to Japan after WW2.
He wanted to study Karate,
and the Japanese,
(Shotokan, I believe)
wouldn’t let him.
Word is…
they actually peed on him.
Well,
this didn’t sit well with Mas,
so he went up into the mountains,
spent a year in seclusion.
Training.
Doing his forms.
Practicing breaking techniques
on boulders.
Yes.
Take a frozen boulder,
chop with the hand,
and it breaks.
Anybody up for that?

So,
a year passes,
and Mas figures
he hasn’t been in the mountains long enough.
Hasn’t run barefoot through the snow long enough.
So…
he spends another year
in the freezing snow,
doing his forms,
breaking boulders with a chop.
Grrr.

Then he comes down,
goes back to the Japanese
and…
somebody gimme a towel…
there seems to be blood on the floor!

Mopped up those suckers.

Now,
I read this story,
several places,
and it was in a movie,
and there seems to be enough truth to it.

What is interesting
is that instructor knew Mas.

My instructor was a skinny, little guy.
But he studied with Don Buck,
and Don was Mas Oyama’s favorite American.
so Bob had to have met and known
this Karate legend.
Interesting.

But,
what I am more interested in
is the work outs Mas must have done.

I live on a mountain,
and I have to chop wood or I freeze.
I have to plant crops,
or food gets scarce.
There work to be done around here.
Sometimes it seems like
there isn’t much time for a work out.

but there is.
There is always time.
You just decide what you want to do
and then you make your life work.
Sometimes it’s tough.
Life says you got to do something else.
But,
you don’t.

Want to hear a neutronic truth?

If you don’t do,
EGG ZACKLY
what you want to do,
then you are wasting your life.

Yes,
you have to live,
you have to work,
you have to contribute
to the society around you.
BUT,
you still have a higher duty to yourself.

So…
if you want to work out,
and life starts getting in the way,
you just bully life
into doing what you want.

I can’t tell you how important this is.

Sometimes it is tough,
sometimes it is easy,
but…
you still have to make life do what you want it to.

Heck,
it is YOUR life.
Not some politician’s,
not your daddy’s,
not your child’s,
not your boss’s,
not anybody but yours.

So,
here comes the question…
do you have a boulder in your backyard?
No,
you don’t have to live in the mountains.
Heck,
Mas had to be crazy, right?
Anybody who feels he has to go live in the wilderness
to be a better person…
that guy has to be nuts.
Right?
Grin.

BUT…
do you have a boulder in your backyard?
It’s a simple thing.
Or a stack of bricks?
Or a 100 foot tall redwood for a maki wara?
Or some other way to practice your basics
every single day.

You see,
when you get down and dirty,
when you reach the state of mind
that requires breaking snow covered boulders
in the high, high mountains,
you realize something…
it is not that fancy form that is so important,
it is not that complex move
that you wouldn’t have time to do in a fight.
It is your basics.
It is breathing into your movement,
sinking your weight
and aligning,
figuring out how to let go
so that energy comes out of you
with no effort.

So,
do you have a boulder in your backyard?

Have a great work out!

Al

Here’s the link for…THE PUNCH

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/hard-punch/

That’ll help you make little rocks out of big rocks.

If you want to get this newsletter regularly sign up through the FREE Martial Arts Books deal at MonsterMArtialArts.com