Category Archives: deadliest martial arts

I Just Received the Ultimate Martial Arts Insult!

Newsletter 750
My feelings is Hurt!

Good afternoon!
Sun is out,
I’ve worked out a couple of times today.
Need to finish this,
then I can work out again!
Absolutely have to!

I received the ultimate martial arts insult
the other day.
Some guy penned it
on one of my blogs,
or somewhere.
He told me,
(choke)
My art was no better than
‘Enter the Dojo.’

Oh, how I cried.

Enter the Dojo,
for those of you who have lived in a cave these last few years,
is a satire
wherein the ultimate instructor
demonstrates the ultimate art.
His.
And,
there are all sorts of shenanigans.
Between his students ‘mistakes,’
tournament doings,
and all sorts of advice
on the REAL art,
one is left to blink,
shake their head,
and suddenly guffaw.
It really is funny.
And,
here I was,
compared to that oaf.
That insane dojo of idiots.
But here’s the funny thing,
Do you know how incredibly hard it is to be funny?
Ask somebody to make you laugh,
they will blink, stutter, and look at you oddly.
but these guys and gals on
‘Enter the Dojo,’
make it look easy.
They have a polish to their idiocy
that makes you accept it.
in otherwords,
they have a high art.

Now,
does this art leech over into their physical martial arts?

In a way,
I would think it would have to.
The timing,
the physical perfection of their faces and moves,
this is not something a two year comes up with,
this is polished professionals at work.
Or,
at least people who have a high appreciation
for skilled maneuvers.

So,
how upset am I,
really,
at being compared to Enter the Dojo?
Gawd,
I consider it a high compliment.
To be compared to people with that high desire of polish,
even if only in their comedy,
is quite a compliment.
But,
as I said,
that kind of awareness
has to have a base,
an understanding of what lies beneath,
not just in the art,
but in the soul.
So,
I guess I won’t cry after all.
In fact,
think I’ll grin.
And,
it just goes to show off a neutronic fact:
people who make fun of others,
are making fun of themselves.
Or maybe it was:
people who insult others,
insult only themselves.
Well,
something like that.
I’ll keep watching Enter the Dojo,
maybe i’ll get it right.

And,
you guys and gals,
hurry up and work out!
The universe is waiting your brilliance!

And,
get out of that cave and check out Enter the Dojo,
and,
as long as you’re out of the cave,
you might just as well check out

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/rolling-fists/

It is state of the art freestyle,
done in living color.

Now,
have a great work out!

Al

http://www.amazon.com/Matrixing-Tong-Bei-Internal-Gung/dp/1507869290/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1423678613&sr=8-1&keywords=tong+bei

A Strange Martial Arts Fear

Newsletter 749
What are You Really Afraid Of!

A fellow wrote me a couple of weeks ago,
and told me of an interesting situation.
He has a friend,
and the friend practices martial arts.
Day after day he goes to the dojo,
and receives the lessons of pain and bruises.

american karateHe’s dedicated.
Martial Arts are the monkey on his back,
and he firmly convinced
that without pain,
there is no gain.

Interesting viewpoint.
Pain is a warning sign,
means some part of your body is in danger,
change what you are doing.

Of course,
there is the good pain,
going through fatigue,
pushing yourself through hard work outs,
risking a few bruises or a bloody nose
just to learn a little extra.
But…be careful.
Pain is definitely a warning bell.

Now,
that understood,
the fellow who wrote me,
who studies matrixing,
sat down with his friend
and explained the facts of life.
He explained that pain is a warning sign,
and he told this fellow
about how to use energy,
how to move without risking the body,
and all sorts of things.

The fellow was blown away.
It made sense,
and he really started examining what he was doing,
and then he made a rather bizarre statement.
He was afraid that matrixing
would undo what he was learning,
and he was afraid that his instructor
wouldn’t like what he was learning.

He’s being taught to take a good kick in the balls,
but he’s afraid that getting out of the way
will end the experience of being kicked in the balls.
And he’s afraid that the guy who is kicking him in the balls
won’t like that he is learning not to be kicked in the balls.
Think about it.

The Chinese did not have logic,
nor did any of the Asian Martial Arts.
Over the millennium
they devised amazing systems,
systems based on the memorizing of random strings of data.
Sort of like running a two mile maze
to get from A to B,
which,
in truth,
was only a 100 yards apart.

These systems really are amazing,
but,
they are easily replaced by this thing called logic.
Good logic,
interestingly enough,
looks like common sense.
But,
you know common sense,
it’s not common.

Anyway,
the point here is that when you matrix
you are supposed to unlearn things.
You are supposed to take apart these random strings of data,
and put them together in a more logical format.

To be afraid that you aren’t unlearning,
is to be afraid of learning (logic).
Is to be trapped by mysticism.

And,
what is going to happen if you actually unlearn illogic,
and learn real logic?
Are you going to turn to stone?
Is your instructor going to take away your belt?
(you didn’t really learn anything, you fool!)
What?

Anyway,
i wish I had a good end to this tale I have just told you,
but my understanding is that the fellow
went back to systems of pain and randomity.
He didn’t pursue matrixing,
and you know what happens now…
in a few months or years
he will start figuring some of the stuff out
that he was told,
and he will say the incredible
‘We have that in our system.’
He won’t associate what he was told,
with what pops up in his head
in a few months or years.

Heck,
people will probably even be in awe of him,
such brilliance.

Ah, well,
that’s life.

But,
for those of you who aren’t afraid,
who have the ability to take things apart,
and simply fix them,
the name of the place is
MonsterMartialArts.com.

If you’re new to this stuff,
check out Matrix Karate.
If you’re old to the game,
just go through the site and figure out your next step.

And,
whatever you do,
have a great work out!
Al

http://www.amazon.com/Matrixing-Tong-Bei-Internal-Gung/dp/1507869290/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1423678613&sr=8-1&keywords=tong+bei

Do People Who Buy Gimmicks Deserve to Die

The gimmicks I refer to are martial arts internet scams.

I opened up my email today and found a little gem about ‘family self-defense. It opened with the usual, a scary scenario where a guy’s whole family is at gunpoint. Then proceeded to state that anybody could kill you anytime because of the internet (burglars are getting smarter!)

Then, of course, the solution: this guy had studied 13 different arts, but couldn’t defend himself. So, now that he had lain like a victim while his family was terrorized, he had had epiphany. He boiled down his 13 arts, his 1800 useless self defense techniques, and had come up with a ‘family self defense systems.’

tong bei amazon ad

martial arts instructor course

Anybody for a little hard work?

This person talked about how useless classical martial arts are, and how he could now train anybody, even if they were fat, lazy, diabetic and in a coma, to drop a gorilla with a simple one finger pressure point strike, leverage the Gracie Brothers with a simple fulcrum principle, have mental powers that would shield them from an attacker, and all with out using their hands.

And in one hour.

The price, of course was a number ending in 7.

I used to read these ads on the back of comic books, and it appears that the internet is the new comic book ad venue. Back in the sixties it was a guy who kicked sand in your face, but you took this miraculous weight lifting course, beat up the bully, and got the girl.

Now the target for these ads are old men who sit around and worry about Obama, ISIS, and the home invasion that is going to happen to them.

Here is the truth concerning these ads.

You can’t learn anything of value in an hour. Especially not without tons of hours of training to learn about the body, the leverages, the construction of the skeletal structure, and the way people react in combat.

Now, the fellow is right, in certain ways. The Martial Arts can be considered useless conglomerations of techniques that don’t always work…but only if you don’t work at them.

You have to make them work if you’re going to make them work.

Now, I haven’t boiled the martial arts down, I’ve organized them so that techniques become easier to learn. I’ve put logic in them so that intuition can happen faster.

But if you think you aren’t going to have to work, you’re a fool.

So, do the people who buy these internet marketing martial arts gimmicks deserve to die?

Nobody deserves to die.

But these fellows who buy gimmicks, instead of applying themselves to better conditioning, a knowledge of how to defend themselves, will probably be the first to die, or to at least lie like a trussed up pig while bad guys ravage their homes, their daughters, and so on.

IF, home invaders do happen to call on them.

Big If.

Anyway, if you are a success at anything, you know it took long hours and hard work. Sure a few people got lucky and hit the lottery, but the majority of people who have success earned it the old fashioned way: hard work over long hours.

So why not apply that principle to the martial arts?

About the Author: Al Case has been studying the martial arts since 1967. A writer for the magazines, and the originator of Matrixing and Neutronics, he has produced a score of martial arts training videos. All of them take work and intelligence, and not one of them is a gimmick. If you really want to protect yourself, in a logical and efficient fashion, check out Matrix Karate at MonsterMartialArts.com.

How Long Should It Take to Get a Black Belt in Military Martial Arts

How Long Should It Take to Get a Black Belt in MCMAP?

How long it should take to get a black belt is an interesting question in any martial art, let alone in the military.

In Karate or Kung Fu, we are talking four to five years.

marine corps martial arts program

Click ont he cover for the truth!

Back in the forties it would take a year. Maybe less, maybe more. And this was for Karate, Japanese styles, and any other style that had a belt system.

Then Kenpo came along and they started selling black belts on what is referred to as ‘car contract’ sales approaches. That way they could keep students longer and make more money.

The actual contract was designed in Kenpo Karate by a dane instructor from Arthur Murray dance studios.

Which brings up the original point of this article, how long should it take to get a black belt when you are studying a military style, like MCMAP, or the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program.

Well, in a commercial school at the local McDojo strip mall school, at two hours a week you would put in 100 hours in a year, 400 hours in four years.

The marines, or the army or navy, in their basic training, have you 24 hours a day for up to four months. Four months would be 120 days. At one hour a day every day, using old standards before the car contract system came in, most people could earn a black belt in that time.

Of course they might have to do with a little less parade ground drilling, and look at training in how to survive with hand to hand on a battlefield, but it is definitely possible.

And, you would have to overcome certain considerations that the military might have.

For instance, they want you to take courses on leadership, and go up in the ranks before they teach you more martial arts. Which is sort of silly, because it’s like saying you shouldn’t learn how to survive hand to hand combat unless you have been around for a while.

And, they would have to revamp some of their training methods; put in more kicks, change the structure of their training so that empty hand fighting better aligned with weapons, and so on.

Most of all, they would have to consider that soldiers aren’t fodder, but that every soldier should have higher and higher training, that every soldier should have the highest possible chance of surviving on the battlefield.

All this done, wouldn’t it be wonderful if a recruit could go into basic training and come out, 120 days later, a bona fide and deadly black belt?

About the author: Al Case has 50 years in the martial arts, and is the author of Fixing MCMAP: How to Make the Marine Corps Martial Arts into a True Martial Art. Check out his incredibly quick and efficient Black Belt Course at MonsterMartialArts.com. You can do this course in the privacy and comforter of your own home.

http://www.amazon.com/Fixing-MCMAP-Making-Martial-Program/dp/1503181812/ref=sr_1_15?ie=UTF8&qid=1415995791&sr=8-15&keywords=mcmap

The Statistics of the One Year Black Belt

How Long Does It Take to Become a Black Belt?

I just completed an article describing the statistical breakdown of what it takes to earn a black belt. This data is then used to consider whether a person can get a black belt in one year. The results may surprise you, even shock you.

The statistics can be applied to ANY martial art. Kung Fu, Karate, Aikido, whatever.

The article is at Academia: https://www.academia.edu/11530587/How_Long_Does_It_Take_to_Get_a_Black_Belt

I like this site because more serious writers gather, and the concepts considered have more depth.

Again, the article I wrote concerns the statistical breakdown, and the possibility, of earning  black belt in a year or less.

Should it really take you 50 years to learn this form?

Check out the Black Belt course at MonsterMartialArts.com

http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/black-belt-course/

Another Paper on Neutronics in the Martial Arts

Neutronic Handling of Emotion Through Martial Arts

Yes, another academic paper on the martial arts. This one approaches the subject of emotion.

When a fight starts there is a lot of emotion. One of the main things a fighter has to do, or perhaps I should say a martial artist, has to do, is dispense with emotion and get down to business.

martial arts lawHe has to dispense with emotion because emotion tends to obscure motion, makes it harder to analyze and handle force and flow (direction).

So that’s the topic, and the meat, of this paper. how to dispense with emotion and get the job done.

Here’s the link

https://www.academia.edu/11245196/How_to_Handle_Emotion_in_the_Martial_Arts_Through_Neutronics

The interesting thing is that there is almost nothing known about emotion on this planet. It just isn’t in the book of knowledge. Haven’t seen any comprehensive and logical definition of emotion. While i don’t approach that directly in this article, I’m sure you will be able to figure it out from what i say. And, if you don’t, just keep doing your martial arts, keep matrixing them, and consider delving into neutronics.

Have a great day!

Al

New Paper on Neutronics in the Martial Arts

The Initiation of Motion in the Martial Arts

This is an interesting thing: where does motion really come from?

The answer to this is in a rather comprehensive and weighty epistle i just pub listed on Academia.edu. Here’s the link.

https://www.academia.edu/11194218/Moving_the_Body_in_Martial_Arts_with_Neutronics

neutronic martial art philosophy bookThe concept behind this paper deals with the simple question, what makes the brain tell the nerve to tell the muscle so that the body can have motion?

The answer is simple, and yet requires an in depth bit of writing.

Still, wallow through this bit of work and you will find yourself capable of better and more efficient motion. Which is to say your martial arts will be better. You will understand where they come from; you will understand the source of the martial arts.

But, you better get out your big word dictionary, I don’t take prisoners, this is the real skinny and I can’t use words with one syllable to describe it all.

That said, here’s the link again:

https://www.academia.edu/11194218/Moving_the_Body_in_Martial_Arts_with_Neutronics

Have a great work out!

Which is Better, Jujitsu Throwing or Karate Punching

Striking v Grappling

When it comes to Jujitsu throwing or Karate punching I will always take karate punching.

I know this is going to ruffle a few feathers, but let me state my case.

Back in the sixties and seventies there weren’t many organizations, no protective gear, no mommies worrying as they watched their seven year old learn Karate. There were so few schools that I had to travel fifty miles to class, and the only people I trained with were VERY dedicated.

how to get a black belt in on yearDedicated people who didn’t sign up because they had seen a Bruce Lee movie (Bruce Lee wasn’t around when I began Karate, he was yet to come), but because something inside them was driving them.

Over the next few years protective gear was introduced, chain stores started up, people who had studied for a couple of years were promoted and went off to start their own schools, and the worth of Karate sank.

But before that happened I saw people do things that people today simply cannot do.

Can you break a standing brick with a half fist? How about sticking a hole in a board with a single finger? How about taking a full power kick to the groin?

Such things are virtually unheard of these days.

And I am not just an old fuddy duddy hearkening back to the ‘good, old days.’ The things I speak of happened, were verifiable, and the level of Karate was much higher.

Here’s the interesting thing: people can do more back flips and fancy kicks today. People can do more difficult forms.

But they are showing the fat, and the real meat hasn’t even been cooked.

Flash forward…the Ultimate Fighting Championship is the most popular arena in the world. People crowd into MMA schools so they can ground and pound, and classical karate, and Kung Fu and many other arts, are fairly well ignored, or taught to children in large chains, which merely exacerbates the problem.

Yet I have never seen anybody step into the ring and do the type of Karate punch I was trained in. I have never seen anybody who could punch an arm and break a bone with perfect focus and a calm mind.

MMA, you see, is using boxing.

Many claim that Karate punches are too stylistic, won’t work. But none of the people who say such thing trained back when these Karate did work, when students were trained until they could make Karate work, and only the dedicated survived.

About the Author: Al Case began martial arts in 1967. Check out his Outlaw Karate course. There is also an Outlaw Karate book (same material but no video) available on Amazon.

Fundamental Flaw in Marine Corps Martial Arts

Oops, did we do that?

There is a flaw in the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program (MCMAP), and it is a doozy. It’s a lollapalooza..it’s even a killer!

The flaw is very simple: to test for some of the belts you need to take non-martial arts related courses, and you need to be promoted.

marine corps martial arts programNow, the non-martial arts related courses usually refer to leadership courses.

And the second part of this flaw: To be tested a person needs to be promoted.

On the surface these two items aren’t overly alarming, until you examine what actually happens.

These two things reserve the martial arts for the elite, upper echelon, and is thus not for the enlisted man.

Think about it. The boot gets a taste, then he has to jump through extra hoops to enhance his ability on the battlefield. Not fair.

And, here is the terrible news: the martial arts, and this goes for just about any martial art, Karate, Kung Fu, etc., and not just MCMAP, build a person up, and they increase his responsibility, and they make him a better leader, and they expand his moral compass, and they just make darn, better persons.

So with this fatal flaw the Marine Corps are actually stifling those gains, those abilities. In essence, by making a person take leadership courses and get promoted before they test them for advanced belts, they are limiting such things as responsibility and leadership.

It is so very odd that these people don’t understand that the martial arts inherently make better people.

And, one is forced to ask a rather brutal question: are the officers trying to stay elite at the cost of their troops?

And, here is the real kicker: If what I say here is true, then could it be that the Devil Dogs Fighting Discipline is not really a Martial Art? But just a sport designed to kill without the benefit of such things as increased ethics and responsibility!

Fortunately, there is good news here. There is a rumor that this flaw may have been set aside, either in part of whole, and this would be good news.

And, the fact that one can download MCMAP in it’s entirety does enable one to go through the program ‘unofficially’ on their own.

And, it is true that people who have studied disciplines such as Karate, Taekwondo, and so on, can be recognized for their achievement. The recognition comes late in the belt ranking system, more in the form of a recommendation for the military fighter to avail himself of other disciplines than MCMAP. But it is a start.

About the Author: Al Case has written a two volume work analyzing the Marine Corps Martial Arts. It is called ‘Fixing MCMAP,’ and it is available on Amazon. It is recommended for soldiers wishing to get the most out of their military martial arts training, or for martial artists who wish to get an unbiased and in depth look at the Marine Corps Martial Arts.

New Pan Gai Noon Black Belt!

The Value of Pan Gai Noon

Good morning!
Hmm, afternoon.
Well, good whatever.
It’s easy to lose track of time,
you just sink yourself into a work out and
zingo bingo,
where did the time go.

sanchin kata pan gai noonBefore we talk, I want to announce
Will Stockinger!

Will completed studies on Pan Gai Noon.
I think he might be the first
Pan Gai Noon black belt
I’ve awarded.
He’s been sending me videos for a while now,
and he made it look good on the videos.
So well done Will!

A word about the PGN.
Karate is my base art,
I collected a lot of systems over the years.
As I went through these systems
I began to understand certain things
about how Karate evolved.
I understood these things
not from people writing about them,
but from doing the forms myself,
and feeling the changes.
Mind you,
there were a lot of holes,
but Matrixing enables one to find
and fill up the holes in a martial art.
Anyway,
long ago I came across the saying,
that if you don’t know sanchin
you don’t know karate.
And it’s true.

Once I realized this I began to research sanchin.
I collected the various forms of it,
and I realized something:
Uechi Ryu sanchin is for dynamic tension.
Goju sanchin is for breathing.
Shotokan sanchin is for technique.
As you can see,
this represents how sanchin developed from China.
And I began to wonder,
what sanchin looked like in Pan Gai Noon.
But I couldn’t find much on it.
So I relied on matrixing principles,
and set the thing to concepts
which are in buddhist belief systems,
and I wasn’t doing sanchin as a karate form any longer.
Yes, there was still the pop and power,
but there was also flow and emptiness,
and this made the form different in a lot of ways,
opened my eyes to a lot of different concepts.

One of the things I realized
is that you don’t need people to pound on you
to make your form work.
You need gentle pressure
that will make the chi in your body respond.
Pounding doesn’t make the chi work,
it makes the muscles work.
But if you do body testing
the way I describe in
The Master’s Handbook,
then it is different,
and the form is different,
and,
here’s something interesting,
the techniques become different,
and you start to see a logic of technique
that I haven’t see in any other art.
The techniques flow,
and there is a progression of technique
that is startlingly matrix-like.

So these old guys,
back in China,
had designed a system over the decades
and centuries,
that described a closed combat system
that had an inherently matrix-like
progression of techniques.

Mind you,
the student wouldn’t see it,
it’s hidden in the form.
But if you do it long enough,
then it sort of pops at you,
and you start doing the principles of the martial arts,
and not just the techniques.

So that is how I structured
my Pan Gai Noon.
to represent the principles,
to establish the more matrix-like
progression of techniques.

And I wrote about this
in a variety of places.
The Matrixing Chi book
uses Sanchin as the starting point
for developing chi.

I’ve also done a video course,
which is available as part of
‘Evolution of an Art,’
at Monster.
I think this is the only place
where I’ve recorded Sanseirui.

Then there is the book
‘Pan Gai Noon.’
I think it is based on the course book,
with a few things added.

And,
there are lots of places
where I’ve touched upon the art,
written articles about it,
and so on.
Here is one of the best…

http://monstermartialarts.com/three-secrets-pan-gai-noon-karatekung-fu/

So there is a lot of things you can do
to examine my work,
and make up your own mind.

At any rate,
I do consider Sanchin,
and the other two forms,
seisan and sanseirui,
as extremely important.

Okay,
if you’re interested,
I recommend the Evolution of an Art course,
it’s got three arts in it,
Pan Gai Noon, Kang Duk Won, Kwon Bup.
That’s three books,
and three sets of video tapes,
for the price of one course.
And the books on those courses,
are also in the books I’ve
put upon Amazon.

Here’s the link
http://monstermartialarts.com/martial-arts/evolution-of-a-martial-art/

And,
that all said,
oinkly donkey
time to move on.

Again,
congrats to Will,
thanks for your hard work.
Yours is an amazing journey.

And,
to everyone…
HAVE A GREAT WORK OUT!

Al

PS
Have a great Superbowl sunday!
And don’t forget to work out
after you pig out!